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Home gym- upstairs? *stupid question alert*

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Digger83
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2010/05/07 23:16:21 (permalink)

Home gym- upstairs? *stupid question alert*

My sisters boyfriend has wanted to start training for ages, some months he asked if he could come to the gym and train with me, but due to the fact that he's only 14 and has no real source of income he wouldnt have been able to afford the membership fees and I think my gym has an over 16 only policy anyway, so that idea fizzled out quickly.
He now has the opportunity to buy a bench, a squat rack, a few barbells and 150kg in weight for next to nothing because the seller just wants to get rid of them.
He wants to buy them, put them in the spare room upstairs at his parents house and then maybe add more equipment as time goes on.
His dad doesn't want him to do it because he is concerned that the ceiling/floor won't be able to comfortably support so much weight and it will cause structural damage to the house.
I'm pretty sure his concerns are unfounded and irrational, or...does he have a point?
I can't see how this could be true, I mean the average bedroom contains just as much weight in the form of wardrobes full of clothes/bed/lelectrical goods etc etc...
#1

17 Replies Related Threads

    thermique
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    Re:Home gym- upstairs? *stupid question alert* 2010/05/07 23:36:58 (permalink)
    Dont think the weight itself will be a problem, but things like dropping the bar after a deadlift might damage the ceiling/crack it?
    #2
    HELLBOY..
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    Re:Home gym- upstairs? *stupid question alert* 2010/05/07 23:38:57 (permalink)
    Typical domestic floors are designed to take around a max of 150kg/m2. Pretty much designed for a party of fat people. I would get some plywood, 12mm, to spread the load. He isn't going to be using the 150kg to start out anyway.
    #3
    Designpump
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    Re:Home gym- upstairs? *stupid question alert* 2010/05/08 00:43:28 (permalink)
    Should be fine m8, its like thermique said, dropping any weight will crack the ceiling and probably send any ceiling lights to the floor (I speak from experience when a plastic collar lock snapped). Get him to invest in some floor pads (Argos sell some decent York ones). These will help cushion the weights when set down or accidentally dropped.
    #4
    BIGDOWNUNDER
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    Re:Home gym- upstairs? *stupid question alert* 2010/05/08 04:15:06 (permalink)
    You'll be fine
     


    I'll cross that bridge after i've burned it.
    #5
    Designpump
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    Re:Home gym- upstairs? *stupid question alert* 2010/05/08 09:28:27 (permalink)
    When did you creep into my house and photograph my bench? Looks almost edible
    #6
    Irish Beast
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    Re:Home gym- upstairs? *stupid question alert* 2010/05/08 09:33:03 (permalink)
    Its fine. I have load of equipment in our upstairs room. Not damage apart from a tiny of paint falling off the living room ceiling. No damage though!

    Just don't drop heavy weights. I have foam pads that I use for Deadlifts which take the impact a bit if I do drop a bit heavy.



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    #7
    TRAMP
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    Re:Home gym- upstairs? *stupid question alert* 2010/05/08 09:51:45 (permalink)
    as said above, the weight wouldn't be a concern....but the joists flexing slightly under repetative movement with the weight could well in turn crack the paint/plaster on the ceiling below.

    I would look at laying a sheet of ply to lift on though as dropping a heavy weight on a timber floor could (if heavy enough) crack it
    post edited by Neb - 2010/05/08 09:52:56
    #8
    Digger83
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    Re:Home gym- upstairs? *stupid question alert* 2010/05/08 13:57:30 (permalink)
    Well, thanks for the advice fellas.
    I'll put the suggestions of boarding or mats to him if/when he talks his dad into letting him set the gym up
    #9
    essex_chris
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    Re:Home gym- upstairs? *stupid question alert* 2010/05/08 14:07:10 (permalink)
    I wouldn't do it personally. He'd be better off getting that stuff and storing it till he has somewhere to use it.

    Just too much potential for something to go wrong. Dropping the bar with much on it at all has the potential to bugger up a floorboard, let alone make a right old racket.

    Can he used it outside at all? Best not to put him off as it's a great thing in the long run

    Awesome pic, but Tony you're not doing yourself many favours posting up tips on preventing the gag reflex and then a picture of a guy touching his toes - Ak
    #10
    rightyho
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    Re:Home gym- upstairs? *stupid question alert* 2010/05/08 14:22:17 (permalink)
    HELLBOY..

    Typical domestic floors are designed to take around a max of 150kg/m2. Pretty much designed for a party of fat people. I would get some plywood, 12mm, to spread the load. He isn't going to be using the 150kg to start out anyway.


    150kg on a barbell would be concentrated into an area much less than a square metre though mate - a few square inches more like.
    #11
    essex_chris
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    Re:Home gym- upstairs? *stupid question alert* 2010/05/08 15:10:35 (permalink)
    Indeed. even clunking around with heavy DBs would be a no-no.

    Help him out and get a quick popup gazebo

    Awesome pic, but Tony you're not doing yourself many favours posting up tips on preventing the gag reflex and then a picture of a guy touching his toes - Ak
    #12
    infidel
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    Re:Home gym- upstairs? *stupid question alert* 2010/05/08 15:25:03 (permalink)
    i have just over six hundred kilos of weight in an upstairs room with a wooden floor.
    i deadlift four plates a side, and have never had so much as a squeek out of the floorboards, and no split plaster.
    150 kilos will be fine.
    #13
    kitty
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    Re:Home gym- upstairs? *stupid question alert* 2010/05/08 15:45:05 (permalink)
    I bet many women (not me) have a wardrobe with shoes in that weigh more than that

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    #14
    HELLBOY..
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    Re:Home gym- upstairs? *stupid question alert* 2010/05/08 16:03:28 (permalink)
    rightyho

    HELLBOY..

    Typical domestic floors are designed to take around a max of 150kg/m2. Pretty much designed for a party of fat people. I would get some plywood, 12mm, to spread the load. He isn't going to be using the 150kg to start out anyway.


    150kg on a barbell would be concentrated into an area much less than a square metre though mate - a few square inches more like.


    Righty, you are correct in that the load would be concentrated into an area of less than a m2, but you are not comparing like for like. You can't compare a point load with an area load. You must consider what the floor has actually been designed for. Let us assume the floor spans 4m. It will have been designed for a load of 150kg/m2 over the entire area, or the equivalent of a point load of 600kg in the centre. This is much more than our potential MT newbie shall be lifting. So unless he is lifting weights in a room full of fat people dancing, it is very unlikely that the floor will fail. The plywood will help spread the load as well as providing impact protection.

    #15
    rightyho
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    Re:Home gym- upstairs? *stupid question alert* 2010/05/08 16:16:52 (permalink)
    I have to confess I know little about the engineering math behind structural calculations but I am having trouble getting my head around that idea being a general model, mate.

    #16
    essex_chris
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    Re:Home gym- upstairs? *stupid question alert* 2010/05/08 16:35:46 (permalink)
    It's not just about failing though. Even with the best intentions it might be that due to loss of grip he dumps a 100kg deadlift. That's a significant whack and may very well crack paint. If the floorboards aren't in good nick they may crack, maybe even break.

    Personally i wouldn't do it in my house. Maybe with a sheet of ply, plus some rubber matting/thick spare bits of carpet it'll be ok.

    Worst case scenario it's a Barratt house and the 150kg bar and plates goes through the floorboards but gets caught maybe by the joists. Major hassle and pain in the arse.

    Given the option to train elsewhere at ground level he only needs 8x4ft floorspace really.

    Awesome pic, but Tony you're not doing yourself many favours posting up tips on preventing the gag reflex and then a picture of a guy touching his toes - Ak
    #17
    BIGDOWNUNDER
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    Re:Home gym- upstairs? *stupid question alert* 2010/05/08 23:05:22 (permalink)
    kitty

    I bet many women (not me) have a wardrobe with shoes in that weigh more than that

     
    Bloody hell! how big are your feet Kitty?

    I'll cross that bridge after i've burned it.
    #18
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