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Hot!Staffordshire bull terriers

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Lay
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Re:Staffordshire bull terriers 2013/11/12 10:20:58 (permalink)
Just reiterate what others have already said really. Make sure they're kept amused and walked as they have inquisitive minds and will get into mischief. Harmless stuff, but a little destructive. Oh, and their chewing stage can be like no other dog. They laugh at anything made of wood! For Jack we hung a car tyre from our tree in the back garden with some rope - he loved swinging on it!

Got loads of stories about him. He was very territorial about his garden, so much so that not even birds were allowed in it. Remember him running after a cat, through a load of washing, and head first into the washing line pole. Bugger me it shook!
post edited by Lay - 2013/11/12 10:22:40
#41
967Stuart
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Re:Staffordshire bull terriers 2013/11/12 12:22:36 (permalink)
Got my boy from a re-homing center.
 
He really is a good dog, we've got a toddler running about and he's good as gold (although he loves licking her ears!)
 
One thing I would say is, make sure you are 100% committed and have a serious think about it.
Staffies are lovely dogs but they demand routine and they need to know their place in the house. 
Give my dog an Inch and he would destroy the place!.... give him a daily 2 miles jog/run and some play time and he's happy as larry. 
If you think they will be happy to go out once a week and entertain themselves, then think again.
 
#42
Sciatic
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Re:Staffordshire bull terriers 2013/11/12 12:48:37 (permalink)
My favourite breed of all time. Once you have own/ed a Staffie they will always be in your heart. I had one when I lived with my parents many years ago and she lived until 16yrs. That's a killer when they go. I would love one now as there are just me and the wife, al kids have fled the nest, but we work long hours and it just would not be fair on any dog. You have to take into consideration just how much energy these wonderful dogs have and 45 mins a day will not do the job mate. They really need to be tired out or you'll just get an unhappy Staffie. Can't wait to retire and probably re-home one, two, three...who knows how many we'll end up with. A beautiful breed indeed, loving and loyal. 


#43
dazc
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Re:Staffordshire bull terriers 2013/11/12 12:50:34 (permalink)
in my experience staffys are very often dog aggressive, but brilliant with people.  I live in a nice area so most of the dog owners round here are decent not the stereotypical problem chavs with poorly trained and kept dogs.
 
staffys and one of a couple of breeds that have more often than not been a problem, in as much as they have gone for my dog.


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#44
johnny bravo
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Re:Staffordshire bull terriers 2013/11/12 13:14:32 (permalink)
exactly same experience as me that Daz.

"Knowledge is knowing that a tomato is a fruit.   Wisdom is knowing not to put it in a fruit salad"

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#45
dazc
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Re:Staffordshire bull terriers 2013/11/12 13:32:14 (permalink)
johnny bravo

exactly same experience as me that Daz.

rare that I even try letting mine socialise with staffys now, its happened too many times. I just recall her, put the lead on and walk past, if theirs is off lead ill usually ask them to get the dog under control before it gets to me. heard oh he's fine just before its hung of my dogs neck too many times!  really upsets her and takes a couple of days before shes back to herself, just not worth it!
 
Ive ment more staffys than any other breed that hated other dogs as well.  But they are awesome with people, and great fun dogs.  kind of ironic really that chavs get them for 'hardness' when they are almost never people aggressive!
 
 
 
 


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Barbarian999
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Re:Staffordshire bull terriers 2013/11/12 13:32:34 (permalink)
Mate, a lot of breeds growl if they are stroked whilst eating, they do not want to disturbed at meal times...my mums boxer growled whilst eating....dont let it put you off, it's normal behavoiur
#47
dazc
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Re:Staffordshire bull terriers 2013/11/12 13:36:41 (permalink)
Barbarian999

Mate, a lot of breeds growl if they are stroked whilst eating, they do not want to disturbed at meal times...my mums boxer growled whilst eating....dont let it put you off, it's normal behavoiur

 
you should be able to take your dogs food off it without any aggression at all.  the dog should move away when you touch the bowl, just the same as it should drop a toy its holding when you touch it!  Aggression is a challenge to your leadership, and is a sign of a poorly trained dog that doesn't respect its place in the pecking order.
 
properly trained dogs should see you as being in charge without question



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#48
wolverine83
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Re:Staffordshire bull terriers 2013/11/12 13:39:16 (permalink)
Barbarian999

Mate, a lot of breeds growl if they are stroked whilst eating, they do not want to disturbed at meal times...my mums boxer growled whilst eating....dont let it put you off, it's normal behavoiur

It is common behaviour in lots of dogs but it's something that should be dealt with as it shows aggressiveness and possession which are not good qualities to have in a family dog. I have never had any issues with this but apparently one technique that works well is to approach the dog's bowl when they are eating and add bits of something yummy a bit at a time - they learn to associate you being around their food with something positive and the aggression fades.
 
When it comes to aggression with toys or other objects that they grab and you want to get off them, try trading it with something else until they learn that giving something up doesn't mean their fun has to end! 
 
Not sure about aggression when trying to get them off a sofa/bed - when mine has been reluctant to move or has given a cheeky bit of pawing away or a bit mouthy I just shout at him and push him off/pick him up, he doesn't resist too hard!
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johnny bravo
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Re:Staffordshire bull terriers 2013/11/12 13:40:36 (permalink)
tbh id say that it was unacceptable behaviour.

"Knowledge is knowing that a tomato is a fruit.   Wisdom is knowing not to put it in a fruit salad"

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#50
Barbarian999
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Re:Staffordshire bull terriers 2013/11/12 17:09:05 (permalink)
dazc

Barbarian999

Mate, a lot of breeds growl if they are stroked whilst eating, they do not want to disturbed at meal times...my mums boxer growled whilst eating....dont let it put you off, it's normal behavoiur


you should be able to take your dogs food off it without any aggression at all.  the dog should move away when you touch the bowl, just the same as it should drop a toy its holding when you touch it!  Aggression is a challenge to your leadership, and is a sign of a poorly trained dog that doesn't respect its place in the pecking order.

properly trained dogs should see you as being in charge without question

Daz our dog then was properley traind - as a previous poster said, that behavior does happen in some breeds - just like my old Boxer dog growled when we went to stroke her week old puppy - subsequent dogs after that didn't. Nothing to do with training them.
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Snugg
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Re:Staffordshire bull terriers 2013/11/12 17:21:40 (permalink)
Barbarian999

Mate, a lot of breeds growl if they are stroked whilst eating, they do not want to disturbed at meal times...my mums boxer growled whilst eating....dont let it put you off, it's normal behavoiur

 
I had a female boxer and I swear she never growled a single time in her life, not at me, anybody else or any other dog. I used to add the odd egg yolk to her biscuits and that kind of thing without any negative reaction. If the food was then a bit too hot for her to eat or whatever she would just sit patiently and wait. I wouldn't accept being growled out under any circumstances that's a sign of a dog with issues imho.
 
 
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Barbarian999
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Re:Staffordshire bull terriers 2013/11/12 17:27:48 (permalink)
Snugg

Barbarian999

Mate, a lot of breeds growl if they are stroked whilst eating, they do not want to disturbed at meal times...my mums boxer growled whilst eating....dont let it put you off, it's normal behavoiur


I had a female boxer and I swear she never growled a single time in her life, not at me, anybody else or any other dog. I used to add the odd egg yolk to her biscuits and that kind of thing without any negative reaction. If the food was then a bit too hot for her to eat or whatever she would just sit patiently and wait. I wouldn't accept being growled out under any circumstances that's a sign of a dog with issues imho.



She was a bit of a weird one though - growled when we stroked her on the top of her head - had fits etc - sent her to a farm in the end. Our other dogs since have been fine, I think the Boxer was a one off, rather than lack of training.
#53
dazc
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Re:Staffordshire bull terriers 2013/11/12 18:46:46 (permalink)
Barbarian999

Daz our dog then was properley traind - as a previous poster said, that behavior does happen in some breeds - just like my old Boxer dog growled when we went to stroke her week old puppy - subsequent dogs after that didn't. Nothing to do with training them.

 
i guess we all approach things differently, train dogs in different ways etc etc.  but personally for me, i feel growling at me is absolutely unacceptable whatever the situation, and its not tolerated ever! Id class it as a training issue.  its a challenge to your authority and in my mind means the dog is unsure about who is in charge.  The dog may be fully obedient, but for me personally training is about more than that and growling would be a sign that i needed to do more work on reinforcing whos the boss.  
 
happy dogs need to know their place, and be loved, in that order!
 
im far from an expert though, and this is purely my take on what ive found works for me!


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teapot
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Re:Staffordshire bull terriers 2013/11/12 19:59:07 (permalink)
dazc

Barbarian999

Mate, a lot of breeds growl if they are stroked whilst eating, they do not want to disturbed at meal times...my mums boxer growled whilst eating....dont let it put you off, it's normal behavoiur


you should be able to take your dogs food off it without any aggression at all.  the dog should move away when you touch the bowl, just the same as it should drop a toy its holding when you touch it!  Aggression is a challenge to your leadership, and is a sign of a poorly trained dog that doesn't respect its place in the pecking order.

properly trained dogs should see you as being in charge without question

 
 
100%
#55
fat dad
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Re:Staffordshire bull terriers 2013/11/13 03:43:29 (permalink)
funny i should find this thread just now.  They are a brilliant breed, their origional nickname was the 'nanny dog'   cos they were so good around young kids and although they were fighting dogs they were also bred as house dogs eg a family pet but also rat catchers and guard dogs.  but you say you dont like any type of aggression in yr pet so mebbe you should get a rabbit ? aggression is part of a dogs nature every dog born has it, every single dog could potentially kill a baby, the most docile lab  will bite in the right/wrong  circumstances. staffies are terriers and terriers are supposed to have aggression its not been bred out as much like springers or labs. you should have a rethink any type of terrier would probably be wrong for you, but if you do get one and put in the time and effort you'll never regret it, also loads of staffies talk in some way, mine sings 
mine bit me yesterday my other dog set on her and i tried to break it up and she snapped and got me, totally my fault she was just being a dog lmao 
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wolverine83
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Re:Staffordshire bull terriers 2013/11/13 10:55:36 (permalink)
fat dad
also loads of staffies talk in some way, mine sings 

 
I'd love to hear that! The only noises mine makes really are sneezes, yawns, burps, farts and whinges. He very very rarely barks - I think the last time I heard him bark was several months ago.
 
I agree about growling, I wouldn't find it acceptable but every dog is different I guess, I know if it were mine growling then I would sort that out straight away because it's just not in his character. Even when he's been annoyed at something and has given a surly, lip-curling look he's been told off massively as a deterrent towards that kind of behaviour. Totally agree with dazc, as much as he's part of my family he needs to know his place!
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Snugg
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Re:Staffordshire bull terriers 2013/11/13 11:36:15 (permalink)
fat dad

you say you dont like any type of aggression in yr pet so mebbe you should get a rabbit ? aggression is part of a dogs nature every dog born has it, every single dog could potentially kill a baby, the most docile lab  will bite in the right/wrong  circumstances.

 
I really don't agree with this, I've known plenty of dogs that don't have a bad bone in their body. I'm sure in the wrong hands, i.e some abusive chav owners any dog could become aggressive but I think the right breed in the right hands, well brought up, socialised early and well trained should have no aggression towards it's family. A little bit of aggression towards other dogs or being weary of strangers would be understandable but with all due respect I think you're completely wrong about this.
 
Having your dog bite you and just saying 'oh well it was my fault I got in the way' means you're doing something wrong. Saying that I've known a couple of rescue dogs that had a very tough life early on, cigarette burns etc and they never completely got rid of all their behaviour issues but I saw that as understandable. If your dog is healthy and you raised it from a pup then the problem is at your end of the lead.
 
For what it's worth about labs, I've found the breed can quite often have aggression issues, don't get me wrong I love the breed but I don't think their reputation as being really soft and gentle is necessarily true.
 
I'm no dog expert by any means but I know enough to know that any experienced trainer would not agree with your take on this.  
 
post edited by Snugg - 2013/11/13 11:40:55
#58
fat dad
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Re:Staffordshire bull terriers 2013/11/13 11:48:17 (permalink)
try you tube there used to be a few vids on there of staffies singing n talking, i wasn't looking for a staff when i got her but im so glad i did, funniest thing ive ever seen, but she is a rescue dog so i always knew there could be unforseen probs 
#59
rightyho
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Re:Staffordshire bull terriers 2013/11/13 11:59:40 (permalink)
Snugg
Having your dog bite you and just saying 'oh well it was my fault I got in the way' means you're doing something wrong.

Not at all.
Read up on redirected aggression - most animals have it - including humans.
It's not personal, just a natural reaction.
One of the absolute best ways to get bitten is to break up two dogs scrapping - in the heat of the moment, your hand is fair game. Doesn't mean there's a fault with the dog or that it meant to have a pop at the hand (or the owner).
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