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Antioxidant activity of vitamin B6 delays homocysteine-induced atherosclerosis

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James
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2006/07/15 17:29:30 (permalink)
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Antioxidant activity of vitamin B6 delays homocysteine-induced atherosclerosis

Antioxidant activity of vitamin B6 delays homocysteine-induced atherosclerosis in rats Authors: Endo, Naoko1; Nishiyama, Kazuo2; Otsuka, Akira3; Kanouchi, Hiroaki4; Taga, Masaki5; Oka, Tatsuzo1

Source: British Journal of Nutrition, Volume 95, Number 6, June 2006, pp. 1088-1093(6

Abstract:

Elevated plasma homocysteine is a risk factor for atherosclerotic disease. In the present study, we have examined whether the oxidative stress due to a low level of vitamin B6 accelerates the development of homocysteine-induced atherosclerosis in rats. First, the effect of homocysteine thiolactone intake (50 mg/kg per d) on vascular integrity, lipid peroxide concentration, endothelial NO synthase (eNOS) expression and biochemical profiles was examined at day 1, day 21 and day 42 (five rats per group). The histochemical staining of the rat aorta showed no change at day 1 and day 21, but the subendothelial space was observed to be enlarged in rat aorta at day 42 with exposure to homocysteine thiolactone. Expression of eNOS was observed in rat aorta at day 42, but not at day 1 and day 21. Serum lipid peroxide concentration and biochemical profiles including glucose cholesterol and triacylglycerol showed no change at any day. Second, the effect of homocysteine thiolactone intake in the presence and absence of vitamin B6 on vascular integrity was examined at day 1 and day 14 (five rats per group). Aortic lesions were observed in vitamin B6-deficient rat aorta at day 14 but not in vitamin B6-supplemented rats. The expression of eNOS was also observed in vitamin B6-deficient rat aorta at day 14. Serum lipid concentrations of the vitamin B6-deficient group significantly increased compared with concentrations of the vitamin B6-supplemented group, though serum concentration of homocysteine did not change between both groups. These results suggest that the oxidative stress caused by a low level of vitamin B6 accelerates the development of homocysteine-induced atherosclerosis in rats.
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    Nigeepoo
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    RE: Antioxidant activity of vitamin B6 delays homocysteine-induced atherosclerosis 2006/07/16 02:35:45 (permalink)
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    Hasn't Kilmer McKully been banging-on about homocysteine (& Vits B6, B12 & Folic acid to lower it) since ~1970?
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    ClairieB
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    RE: Antioxidant activity of vitamin B6 delays homocysteine-induced atherosclerosis 2006/07/18 09:40:08 (permalink)
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    The homocysteine lowering effects of certain B vitamins are well documented in the scientific literature, as you say Nige.

    I guess this study is showing that elevated homocysteine, due to B6 deficiency, causes measurable, deleterious effects on arterial structure and function and therefore indicates that compromised B6 status is a risk factor for cardiovascular disease.

    Interestingly, I conducted a pilot study on the effects of folate supplementation on measures of oxidative stress. While the homocysteine lowering properties of folate are well known, I was investigating whether it exerted an antioxidant effect, for which there is a little evidence (see papers by Hilary Powers for more info). Unfortunately, I could not demonstrate such an effect (in fact, there was a non significant pro-oxidant effect of folate supplementation!)

    It is possible that B vitamins exert their effects on the cardiovascular system through methods in addition to homocysteine lowering. As ever, it needs more research.
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