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Calorie Deficit and BMR

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Steedie
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2009/07/27 12:36:02 (permalink)
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Calorie Deficit and BMR

Hi all
 
Just want to clear up some confusion, probably a simple question with a very simple answer
 
But when you're doing a cut, should you be taking the calorie deficit from your BMR (of which mine is 2100) or should we be doing it from the BMR x Activity Level (3185)
 
It sounds silly I know, but I see a lot of cutting diets on here and it seems it's doing it based on the resting BMR rather than the activity based one
 
Cheers
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    James
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    Re:Calorie Deficit and BMR 2009/07/28 17:01:13 (permalink)
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    Do you need to work this out?  How do you know the figures are accurate?

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    stevescholes18
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    Re:Calorie Deficit and BMR 2009/07/28 18:03:24 (permalink)
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    taking the calorie deficit from?

    Just eat calories equal to your estimated resting metabolism. Deficit through exercise.
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    Scaryant
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    Re:Calorie Deficit and BMR 2009/07/29 14:46:26 (permalink)
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    Thanks for the question and answer, I was recently wondering the same thing - came across the answer on another site but it's good to have it confirmed.
    The way I understand it is - if your BMR is (roughly!) 2100 calories and you consume that amount you will not gain or lose weight. But if you exercise you will burn a portion of those calories consumed and therefore be in a deficit and you will have lost weight that day. The rule of thumb appears to be not to consume greater than 500 calories under your BMR and not to lose more than a 1/2 kg (1 lb) per week.

    There are 3500 calories in a lb of fat, so technically this means if you want to lose weight at a healthy rate you should aim to be in a 500 calorie deficit each day - either through diet, exercise or both!

    Feel free to correct me :)
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    Big M!
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    Re:Calorie Deficit and BMR 2009/07/29 16:12:59 (permalink)
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    Steedie

    Hi all
     
    Just want to clear up some confusion, probably a simple question with a very simple answer
     
    But when you're doing a cut, should you be taking the calorie deficit from your BMR (of which mine is 2100) or should we be doing it from the BMR x Activity Level (3185)
     
    It sounds silly I know, but I see a lot of cutting diets on here and it seems it's doing it based on the resting BMR rather than the activity based one
     
    Cheers



    It depends on what your activity level is throughout the day. You're besting working at your BMR, and if you have a high activity level throughout the day, manual job, etc, add 500 calories if you don't lose weight then reduce it by 200, and keep doing it. Untill you see a loss of weight at about 1 llb a week. Unless you want to lose weight dramatically and don't care about muscle loss.
    #5
    James
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    Re:Calorie Deficit and BMR 2009/08/01 18:18:18 (permalink)
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    manuka

    James

    Do you need to work this out?  How do you know the figures are accurate?


    i was also curious about this; lots of discussion about BMR etc... If they dont use Harris Benedict to work out their energy requirement, before deducting the 500 (if that is the way), then how is the best way to do it?


    Eat food, see how you get on, and adjust
    #6
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