YB
BannerBanner

Carbohydrate bioavailability

Author
James
Owner & Moderator
  • Total Posts : 50875
  • Reward points: 14530
  • Joined: 2000/11/10 18:09:18
  • Location: Northants, UK
  • Status: offline
2006/07/11 15:46:59 (permalink)

Carbohydrate bioavailability

Carbohydrate bioavailability

Authors: Englyst, Klaus N.1; Englyst, Hans N.1

Source: British Journal of Nutrition, Volume 94, Number 1, July 2005, pp. 1-11(11)

Publisher: CABI Publishing

Abstract:

There is consensus that carbohydrate foods, in the form of fruit, vegetables and whole-grain products, are beneficial to health. However, there are strong indications that highly processed, fibre-depleted, and consequently rapidly digestible, energy-dense carbohydrate food products can lead to over-consumption and obesity-related diseases. Greater attention needs to be given to carbohydrate bioavailability, which is determined by the chemical identity and physical form of food. The objective of the present concept article is to provide a rational basis for the nutritional characterisation of dietary carbohydrates. Based on the properties of carbohydrate foods identified to be of specific relevance to health, we propose a classification and measurement scheme that divides dietary carbohydrates into glycaemic carbohydrates (digested and absorbed in the small intestine) and non-glycaemic carbohydrates (enter the large intestine). The glycaemic carbohydrates are characterised by sugar type, and by the likely rate of digestion described by in vitro measurements for rapidly available glucose and slowly available glucose. The main type of non-glycaemic carbohydrates is the plant cell-wall NSP, which is a marker of the natural fibre-rich diet recognised as beneficial to health. Other non-glycaemic carbohydrates include resistant starch and the resistant short-chain carbohydrates (non-digestible oligosaccharides), which should be measured and researched in their own right. The proposed classification and measurement scheme is complementary to the dietary fibre and glycaemic index concepts in the promotion of healthy diets with low energy density required for combating obesity-related diseases.

James Collier - MuscleTalk Co-Owner
@JamesCollierMT


#1

6 Replies Related Threads

    USA DEALS
    CK
    Pro-Member
    • Total Posts : 2828
    • Reward points: 5102
    • Joined: 2005/11/22 22:24:03
    • Status: offline
    RE: Carbohydrate bioavailability 2006/07/11 19:04:58 (permalink)
    sorry i think i might be being thick

    but what does that mean? is that saying High and Low GI carbs can be used to lose weight , and therefore not having to be soley be based on low GI carbs?
    #2
    blackj
    Senior Member
    • Total Posts : 240
    • Reward points: 6066
    • Joined: 2005/04/20 17:24:51
    • Status: offline
    RE: Carbohydrate bioavailability 2006/07/12 11:40:09 (permalink)
    I think it means that the plan is to define the different types of carbs found in produce. For example most labelling list protein, fat and carbs and gives a calorific value.
    E.g. whole meal flour is something like 330kcal/100g while white flour will have a similar value. These figures are derived be burning the a flour in oxygen and measureing the heated generated. In the case of whole meal flour while the fibre will burn in oxygen it isn't bioavailable as an energy source in the body therefore while it will have a similar calorific value it actually supplies less energy to the body the an equal amount. I think what James piece means is that if labelling contained a more detail break down of the carb content in foods, in a similar way to what is done for the fat content, then it would provide people with more information and make better choices on produce selection with respect to the fibre/energy and glycaemic content.

    This is just my understanding of the abstract so fell free to correct if I'm wrong
    #3
    CK
    Pro-Member
    • Total Posts : 2828
    • Reward points: 5102
    • Joined: 2005/11/22 22:24:03
    • Status: offline
    RE: Carbohydrate bioavailability 2006/07/12 11:43:59 (permalink)
    thats sounds like it makes sence, no matter how many time i read that quote i just couldnt get my head round it
    #4
    OoOGazOoO
    Pro-Member
    • Total Posts : 21619
    • Reward points: 6505
    • Joined: 2004/08/15 17:30:29
    • Location: Lincs United Kingdom
    • Status: offline
    RE: Carbohydrate bioavailability 2006/07/12 11:51:46 (permalink)
    Interesting stuff.

    I know that the bioavailability of carbs is either hindered of helped during the processing stages, which is often why we tend to stay away from highly processed foods, it tend sto affect the actual carb content as well as the micronutrients which are in the food too.

    I think, if i remember rightly, starch is affected a lot during processing, which obviously affects the bioavailability of it, which affects the way that the small intesin actually digests the foods.
    #5
    freak_in_cage
    Pro-Member
    • Total Posts : 3768
    • Reward points: 8883
    • Joined: 2004/12/31 22:21:55
    • Status: offline
    RE: Carbohydrate bioavailability 2006/07/12 19:36:21 (permalink)
    basically avoid all high GI foods (generally processed & sugary) except fruit IMO
    #6
    James
    Owner & Moderator
    • Total Posts : 50875
    • Reward points: 14530
    • Joined: 2000/11/10 18:09:18
    • Location: Northants, UK
    • Status: offline
    RE: Carbohydrate bioavailability 2006/07/14 00:07:15 (permalink)

    ORIGINAL: freak_in_cage

    basically avoid all high GI foods (generally processed & sugary) except fruit IMO

    No way - sometimes high GI foods can be advantageous

    James Collier - MuscleTalk Co-Owner
    @JamesCollierMT


    #7
    Jump to:
    ©2017 All content is copyright of MuscleTalk.co.uk and its use elsewhere is prohibited.
    (posting guidelines | privacy | advertise | earnings disclaimer | contact us | supported by)
    © 2017 APG vNext Commercial Version 5.5