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Helpful ReplyCommiting a crime and turning yourself in?

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Suspirio
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2014/12/06 22:18:01 (permalink)

Commiting a crime and turning yourself in?

You commit a crime. Not a serious crime by most people's standards but a crime nonetheless. Nobody is aware that you have committed this crime and nobody has actually lost out. You have not stolen from anyone and you have not hurt anyone. However, you have still broken the law.
 
Are you legally required to turn yourself in, despite the fact that nobody has actually reported your crime to the police? Does anyone actually know if this is the case?
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Blub2abs
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Re: Commiting a crime and turning yourself in? 2014/12/06 22:35:33 (permalink)
No.
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Suspirio
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Re: Commiting a crime and turning yourself in? 2014/12/06 22:38:43 (permalink)
Blub2abs
No.




Cheers. On what do you base your answer?
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jack5r
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Re: Commiting a crime and turning yourself in? 2014/12/06 22:44:14 (permalink)
I would of thought yes. 
 

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Blub2abs
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Re: Commiting a crime and turning yourself in? 2014/12/06 22:46:04 (permalink)
I'm not a Lawyer but I am a bit of a buff in matters legal/police procedure etc. 
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jack5r
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Re: Commiting a crime and turning yourself in? 2014/12/06 22:46:27 (permalink)
If I have a gun with no license which is not stolen and hasn't been/won't be used to hurt anyone, I am still breaking the law by having it and so legally I should hand it in, should I not?
 

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Suspirio
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Re: Commiting a crime and turning yourself in? 2014/12/06 22:49:51 (permalink)
I would have thought so too Jack, although dealing with guns is clearly a serious matter. I am referring to minor "victimless" crimes that are not in the same league. Something like, perhaps, selling someone some cannabis as a one off for instance.
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jack5r
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Re: Commiting a crime and turning yourself in? 2014/12/06 22:59:13 (permalink)
haha Suspirio you keep this forum alive with your threads. 
 
Where did the weed come from? Can you be sure there was no violence or suffering which allowed it to get to the seller? I guess if you grew it yourself from seeds you found abroad in a field of marijuana you be sure of this. But buying a couple ounces of some guy and selling it does not mean the weed hasn't caused the suffering of people in order to reach you. The guy with all the ounces may of robbed it and stabbed up another local dealer for it. This does happen even with small time dealers. Either way, you are selling drugs and so you have broken the law. Legally you should turn yourself in. 
 
Buying pirate DVDs for example. A seemingly harmless crime as no one gives a sh!t about hollywoods profits. The guys selling them are treated like slaves though, owned by serious criminal gangs. Our local DVD man got severely stabbed up recently. 

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Suspirio
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Re: Commiting a crime and turning yourself in? 2014/12/06 23:14:24 (permalink)
Ok let's say the weed came from a legal cafe in Amsterdam. You stuffed it into your underpants and came back with it on the ferry. It wasn't much and it was really good weed that you just wanted to let your mates try. You don't want payment from your mates but they insist on giving you some money for it. You are now technically a drug smuggler and a drug dealer but you have not actually hurt anyone. Is there any legal obligation to turn yourself in?
post edited by Suspirio - 2014/12/06 23:34:38
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jack5r
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Re: Commiting a crime and turning yourself in? 2014/12/06 23:25:01 (permalink)
Is it against the law? Yes
 
If you have you broken the law are the legally abridge to hand yourself in? That was your original question and I think the answer is yes. The severity of the crime will not change this. 
 

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Suspirio
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Re: Commiting a crime and turning yourself in? 2014/12/06 23:49:16 (permalink)
Ok being particularly pedantic now. Dropping litter is a criminal offence in the UK under the environmental protection act 1990. You drop an empty packet of quavers in the street. Are you legally obliged to turn yourself in?
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chris182
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Re: 2014/12/07 08:22:28 (permalink)
I used to steal kinder eggs as a child, I was desperate to collect all the green things.
I could have single handedly brought down woolworths due to my senseless robbery.
I was 6 or 7, I haven't stole anything since, but remember apparently there is no such crime as a victimless crime.
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Re: 2014/12/07 12:42:50 (permalink) ☄ Helpfulby gavin882 2014/12/07 13:01:16
In the instances you have described, the police would have better things to do in all honesty and would probably ask you to visit a mental health clinic.

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wolverine83
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Re: Commiting a crime and turning yourself in? 2014/12/08 10:31:46 (permalink)
Suspirio
Ok being particularly pedantic now. Dropping litter is a criminal offence in the UK under the environmental protection act 1990. You drop an empty packet of quavers in the street. Are you legally obliged to turn yourself in?




Are you suggesting that failing to hand yourself in for a crime, is a crime? In which case failing to hand yourself in for failing to hand yourself in is a crime too, and if you fail to hand yourself in for that you're committing further crimes!
 
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Trident
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Re: Commiting a crime and turning yourself in? 2014/12/08 14:55:44 (permalink)
Its an interesting question.
 
Is it actually 'on the books' as a Statute law?
 
I have no idea TBH but I would guess probably not.
 
Is it part of Common law?
 
IMO it could well be as Judges will give a lesser sentence to someone who has admitted a crime even before its been reported and this sets precedent.  If your getting less punishment then its likely its classed as a more serious offence to not admit a crime at the earliest opportunity.
 
 
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Trident
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Re: 2014/12/08 15:04:09 (permalink)
chris182
I used to steal kinder eggs as a child, I was desperate to collect all the green things.
I could have single handedly brought down woolworths due to my senseless robbery.
I was 6 or 7, I haven't stole anything since, but remember apparently there is no such crime as a victimless crime.



Not a worry mate.  If you were in Scotland the minimum age for legal responsibility was 8 back then.
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Suspirio
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Re: Commiting a crime and turning yourself in? 2014/12/08 16:08:11 (permalink)
wolverine83
Suspirio
Ok being particularly pedantic now. Dropping litter is a criminal offence in the UK under the environmental protection act 1990. You drop an empty packet of quavers in the street. Are you legally obliged to turn yourself in?




Are you suggesting that failing to hand yourself in for a crime, is a crime?



I just don't know. That's why I'm asking. Clearly one would hope that the police would have more important things to do than hunt down people who drop litter in the streets. However, dropping litter is still a crime.
 
If you drop litter in the streets but don't turn yourself into the police and you are seen later on CCTV committing this criminal act, have you technically made things worse for yourself by not turning yourself into the police? I have scoured the internet and I cannot actually find an answer.
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Re: Commiting a crime and turning yourself in? 2014/12/08 17:37:56 (permalink)
So, are you asking whether you'd be breaking the law by not turning yourself in? That's how your question sounds... If so, I'd imagine not as the police would charge you for not doing so, and also charge you for whatever law you've broken (whether it be petty theft, etc).
 
Whether you should hand yourself in is more of a moral dilemma for the perpetrator of said crime in my opinion; the police will take care of the rest.
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jack5r
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Re: Commiting a crime and turning yourself in? 2014/12/08 17:42:25 (permalink)
If a crime is broken, it is broken. Something like dropping litter will result in a warning or a fine. The police have a level of discretion that can be used when dealing with on the spot fines and warnings. It is likely that they will just tell you not to do it again if you go up to an officer and admit you had. Or they could fine you I guess.

If you turn yourself in for a more serious crime then the judge will have a level of discretion when deciding on your punishment. Handing yourself in and pleading guilty will greatly reduce the time and cost of a case and so a lesser punishment will likely be given.

Is it a crime in itself to not hand yourself in that can make the sentence worse. No I don't think so. It will not make the punishment worse. But handing yourself in can make the punishment 'less worse'.

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Trident
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Re: Commiting a crime and turning yourself in? 2014/12/08 18:05:25 (permalink)
jack5r


Is it a crime in itself to not hand yourself in that can make the sentence worse. No I don't think so. It will not make the punishment worse. But handing yourself in can make the punishment 'less worse'.

 
So you think its a crime and its against the Law, according to your previous posts, to not hand yourself in,
 
But now its not a 'crime in itself' as it attracts no extra punishment,
 
So your saying its not against the law or a crime as its not punished.
 
Its simply a case of a 'Bonus' for admitting guilt.
 
Which is it?
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