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Diet drinks? What's the deal?

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ryzo
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2011/03/23 11:09:46 (permalink)

Diet drinks? What's the deal?

Guys,
 
I'm seeing a lot of conflicting studies and reports as to how the body handles diet, sugar free, drinks. Some say the body treats the artificial sweetener the same way as sugar and therefore is counter-productive to weight loss? I can't find a definitive answer. What's the deal?
 
Just an FYI. Whilst I am a fan of diet drinks, I try limit myself to one or two cans a day, or 1, 500ml bottle. I imagine though, like with most things, that in moderation it's fine. But I'm more curious as to whether it directly affects weight loss.
 
post edited by ryzo - 2011/03/23 11:11:14
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    Calza
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    Re:Diet drinks? What's the deal? 2011/03/23 11:17:21 (permalink)
    I've heard this too, interested to see the answer!
     
     
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    Big Les
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    Re:Diet drinks? What's the deal? 2011/03/23 11:27:21 (permalink)
    There is one study that I know of that looked at the human response to aspartame in non diabetic healthy adults.
     
    What it found was that there was a small, but measurable anticipatory rise in insulin levels when aspartame was used. It was hypothesised from this that this could be an effect of artificial sweeteners in general because the response is an anticipation of the arrival of sugar signalled by receptors in your mouth.
     
    What this small rise in insulin does, is signals the arrival of sugar: hypothetically, and deductively from the physiology involved you would expect this to be accompanied by a down regulation of fat mobilisation, and a drop in circulating blood glucose levels.
    Without the arrival of sugar the fall in blood glucose levels would then stimulate a hunger response (deductively speaking) as a result of artificial sweetener ingestion.
     
    What we do know is that artificial sweeteners habituate people to sweetness, and when this sweetness is withdrawn the body will crave it.
     
    As for how the body handles sweetener on a non hormonal level - its processed as anything else is, broken down and sorted according to its consitients - sorbitol passes through and is a good laxative, aspartame is metabolised and has a very interesting breakdown (which has led to some wonderful horror storys about it being super toxic - but thats another day and one for the chemists).One thing for sure, artificial sweetners do not go through the same pathways as sugar unless they are a sugar, so one based on maltodextrin (due to its incredibly weak hydrogen bonds) would, but one not based on a sugar/carbohydrate molecule would not.
     
    Hope that helps a bit
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    ryzo
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    Re:Diet drinks? What's the deal? 2011/03/23 11:53:08 (permalink)
    Awesome info there Les. A good read! I will stick with what I'm currently doing, drink them, but in moderation. It doesn't seem that I'll be doing myself much harm or contributing to weight gain.
     
    Thanks.
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    Calza
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    Re:Diet drinks? What's the deal? 2011/03/23 14:45:20 (permalink)
    I'm not sure 2 cans a day is moderation!
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    ryzo
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    Re:Diet drinks? What's the deal? 2011/03/23 15:16:20 (permalink)
    Calza

    I'm not sure 2 cans a day is moderation!

    Seeing as some people are going through large bottles or 6 packs, to me, it is :P
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    theiopener
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    Re:Diet drinks? What's the deal? 2011/03/23 16:55:26 (permalink)
    ryzo
    Guys,

    I'm seeing a lot of conflicting studies and reports as to how the body handles diet, sugar free, drinks. Some say the body treats the artificial sweetener the same way as sugar and therefore is counter-productive to weight loss? I can't find a definitive answer. What's the deal?

    Just an FYI. Whilst I am a fan of diet drinks, I try limit myself to one or two cans a day, or 1, 500ml bottle. I imagine though, like with most things, that in moderation it's fine. But I'm more curious as to whether it directly affects weight loss.

    They have no effect on insulin secretion despite what many people say. I take glucometer readings a lot of the time and i have done so when consuming diet drinks and no change has been observed in my levels of glucose.
     
    I do believe however there is a psychological factor in it which generates a craving for sweet things, which can lead to overeating if sweet things such as diet drinks are a trigger.
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    ryzo
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    Re:Diet drinks? What's the deal? 2011/03/23 16:59:46 (permalink)
    theiopener

    ryzo
    Guys,

    I'm seeing a lot of conflicting studies and reports as to how the body handles diet, sugar free, drinks. Some say the body treats the artificial sweetener the same way as sugar and therefore is counter-productive to weight loss? I can't find a definitive answer. What's the deal?

    Just an FYI. Whilst I am a fan of diet drinks, I try limit myself to one or two cans a day, or 1, 500ml bottle. I imagine though, like with most things, that in moderation it's fine. But I'm more curious as to whether it directly affects weight loss.

    They have no effect on insulin secretion despite what many people say. I take glucometer readings a lot of the time and i have done so when consuming diet drinks and no change has been observed in my levels of glucose.

    I do believe however there is a psychological factor in it which generates a craving for sweet things, which can lead to overeating if sweet things such as diet drinks are a trigger.

    I certainly crave sweet food after a can, however, I can usually keep myself in check. I've heard this from a lot of other people too. If I can some fruit to hand, it usually sorts me out.
     
    Thanks for the input :D
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    Carbzilla
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    Re:Diet drinks? What's the deal? 2011/03/23 19:04:45 (permalink)
    Sitting drinking this can of diet coke...quite interested to see what the deal with them is.....i find it a blessing to knock down a pepsi max or two when cutting up for the summer tho i must admit!
     
    Dont believe that it gives me cravings for sugar afterwards tho...i think that maybe be an excuse for the doughnut lovers out there!!!!
     
     
    #9
    Big Les
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    Re:Diet drinks? What's the deal? 2011/03/23 19:21:46 (permalink)
    My Bad - the study was on saccaharin - not aspartame - aspartame had a more complex presentation in studies - presenting it as a solution with no flavour elicited no response see: while presenting as sham food did - which makes you wonder about a flaboured non nutritive solution - couldnt find that only one on tablets with aspartame.
    [font="%value"]Physiol Behav. 1995 Jun;57(6):1089-95.
    [font="%value"]Sweet taste: effect on cephalic phase insulin release in men. [font="%value"]Teff KL, Devine J, Engelman K.
    [font="%value"]Monell Chemical Senses Center, Philadelphia, PA 19104, USA.
    [font="%value"]Abstract
    [font="%value"] To determine whether sweet-tasting solutions are effective elicitors of cephalic phase insulin release (CPIR) in humans, two studies were conducted using nutritive and nonnutritive sweeteners as stimuli. Normal weight men sipped and spit four different solutions: water, aspartame, saccharin, and sucrose. A fifth condition involved a modified sham-feed with apple pie. The five stimuli were administered in counterbalanced order, each on a separate day. In study 1, subjects tasted the stimuli for 1 min (n = 15) and in study 2 (n = 16), they tasted the stimuli for 3 min. Arterialized venous blood was drawn to establish a baseline and then at 1 min poststimulus, followed by every 2 min for 15 min and then every 5 min for 15 min. In both study 1 and study 2, no significant increases in plasma insulin were observed after subjects tasted the sweetened solutions. In contrast, significant increases in plasma insulin occurred after the modified sham-feed with both the 1 min and 3 min exposure. These results suggest that nutritive and nonnutritive sweeteners in solution are not adequate stimuli for the elicitation of CPIR.

    [font="%value"]and the saccarin/sucrose study for you
    [font="%value"]Appetite. 2008 Nov;51(3):622-7. Epub 2008 May 10. [font="%value"]Cephalic phase insulin release in healthy humans after taste stimulation? [font="%value"] Just T, Pau HW, Engel U, Hummel T. Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, University of Rostock, Doberaner Strasse 137-139, Rostock, Germany. tino.just@med.uni-rostock.de [font="%value"]Abstract [font="%value"] In humans little is known as to whether taste solutions applied to the tongue elicit cephalic phase insulin release (CPIR). The aim of this study was to re-examine if any effect of different taste solutions on CPIR occurs. Under fasting conditions healthy human subjects sipped, and washed out their mouths with eight taste solutions (sucrose, saccharin, acetic acid, sodium chloride, quinine hydrochloride, distilled water, starch, and sodium glutamate) for 45 s and spat them out again. The taste stimuli were not swallowed; they were applied in a randomized order, each on a separate day. Blood collection for determination of plasma glucose and plasma insulin concentrations was performed 3 min before and 3, 5, 7 and 10 min after taste stimulation. Ratings of quality, intensity and hedonic characteristics were also obtained. A significant increase of plasma insulin concentration was apparent after stimulation with sucrose and saccharin. In conclusion, the current data suggest that the sweeteners sucrose and saccharin activate a CPIR even when applied to the oral cavity only.
    [font="%value"] PMID: 18556090 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
     
    [font="%value"]Not bad off the top of my head :)

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