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IT career advice...

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PdB
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2015/01/27 14:52:36 (permalink)
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IT career advice...

What areas of IT do you see as valuable, sought after, sustainable here in the UK in the years to come?  I have been in an Windows infrastructure/service delivery role for many many years, and feel a little out of touch with where things are heading.
There seems to be a lot of demand for programmers, which surprises me... I thought coders were getting outsourced?

In terms of my job role, I have been in a comfortable position for far too long now within a big IT consultancy on a stable project, I appreciate that this is not going to last forever, so I want to prepare for the future in case I find myself out of a job. I am just unsure of which direction is worth studying for...
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    The_Lone_Wolf
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    Re: IT career advice... 2015/01/27 14:53:49 (permalink)
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    Are you on the books of any agencies? If so, ask them what areas are best as they might give you some decent insight. 

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    #2
    PdB
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    Re: IT career advice... 2015/01/27 15:12:11 (permalink)
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    I know a successful recruitment consultant, but he specialises in one particular area within IT and couldn't really help me... only thing he mentioned was that he was trying to find a Go programmer for a city job paying 75k, but couldnt find one anywhere, apparently there are only 200 in the UK
    #3
    Blub2abs
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    Re: IT career advice... 2015/01/27 16:27:03 (permalink)
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    PdB
    What areas of IT do you see as valuable, sought after, sustainable here in the UK in the years to come?  I have been in an Windows infrastructure/service delivery role for many many years, and feel a little out of touch with where things are heading.
    There seems to be a lot of demand for programmers, which surprises me... I thought coders were getting outsourced?

    In terms of my job role, I have been in a comfortable position for far too long now within a big IT consultancy on a stable project, I appreciate that this is not going to last forever, so I want to prepare for the future in case I find myself out of a job. I am just unsure of which direction is worth studying for...




    On the bright side, you had a job through some tough times, so that's good.  Where do you go from here though? It does scare me how many Windows guys seem to be just drifting along, yeah sooner or later you're gonna end up out of work and need to skill up.  But I find it hard to believe after X number of years in IT you really don't know the business reasons for hiring local talent vs overseas. 
     
    Talking to recruiters is a f*cking waste of time, as are most of them. 
     
    Go onto the jobsites and do a search on the highest paying stuff.  See which skills are being requested mostly at the upper levels, and see if you feel like you can learn them.  Chances are in a few years you'll want to branch off into other stuff, so don't worry if it's still well paid in 2020.
    #4
    brittas
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    Re: IT career advice... 2015/01/27 20:03:35 (permalink)
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    I'm an IT Manager and it's the best move I ever made.  It's not for everyone....... I do very little in the way of techy stuff and now I have a decent sized team (I managed a team of 6, last job was only 2), my role is very much planning, meetings, emails, phone calls and HR stuff.  But I enjoy that side of it.
     
    The biggest part of my job is actually project management and that's something I can see myself focusing more on in the future. 
     
    Management roles will never be outsourced.
    #5
    Skrewdriver
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    Re: IT career advice... 2015/01/27 20:29:31 (permalink)
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    Brittas how did u get into pm'ing? What did but do before? What sort of projects are u managing? Is it a case of doing prince 2 and is there any much crossover skill involved from ur techy past? Soz 4 all the q's!

    I used to walk into a room full of people & wonder if they liked me..... Now I look around & wonder if I like them
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    brittas
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    Re: IT career advice... 2015/01/27 20:36:42 (permalink)
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    Skrewdriver
    Brittas how did u get into pm'ing? What did but do before? What sort of projects are u managing? Is it a case of doing prince 2 and is there any much crossover skill involved from ur techy past? Soz 4 all the q's!



    I'm still not officially into PM'ing as such, it just features as part of my role but I'd like to think I could now move into a full time PM role somewhere.
     
    How I got into it....... my route into IT was on the systems side.  I've always (and still do) worked for manufacturing companies and as a result have been through many ERP and CRM system upgrades/change overs.  I've managed projects without even knowing I was managing projects!  
     
    As IT manager, the bulk of my role is now this.  And if it's not a big system change, it's something simple like an Exchange upgrade or a mobile phone roll out, but they are all projects that need managing.
     
    I did get my Prince2 at my last job then got my current job and work for a very laid back, non-corporate style business so haven't used it but it's on my CV.
     
    We're currently implementing a large ERP system in my current place and we work with a team of consultants.  They have their own project manager who manages their side of things and I've learnt so much from him, but equally realised I could do that job quite easily.
    #7
    IWantedDanB
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    Re: IT career advice... 2015/01/27 21:04:11 (permalink)
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    So building on what Brittas said, I think the most valuable and sustainable skills to have, are the management related ones. The model that most large businesses use for their IT setup is to outsource the bread and butter work, but have the offshore resources managed by a local employee in the HQ, perhaps with a smaller local supporting team.
     
    In my case, I'm working in a software testing & QA role for a big finance company. The team I manage are both onshore and offshore, and have much better technical skills than me. However, I am better at organising the resources we have, making sensible policies and decisions, such as seeing how we can implement things like automation to good effect. They write much better scripts for automation than I ever could, but I have the understanding of when, where and how to apply it, and when to not apply it, which is what I get rewarded for.
     
    That's not to say this is the only way, but I think the other real option is to have either the best or the rarest technical skills out there, which for me is a lot harder.
     
     
    #8
    PdB
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    Re: IT career advice... 2015/01/28 14:54:50 (permalink)
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    Interesting thoughs so far, thanks
    Yes, there are a few Windows people floating/drifting about, only a few weeks ago I got chatting to a bloke down the gym who I'd only previous said "alright mate" to before.. turns out that he is yet another Windows guy... he had been contracting before, but was currently out of work and had been for about three months....
     
    I'm going to talk to my recruitment mate tomorrow in depth, see what his thoughts are...
     
    I am currently organising a training course through my company, "ITIL Capability Certificate in Release Control and Validation" - given that that is part of what my current job is, I already have the ITIL Foundation. An extra certification won't harm me, and Release Management IS management...
    I have also today (luckily it's been a quiet week so far) been doing a free online Introduction to Prince 2 course from our intranet... -
     
    Just tossing up whether I'd perform better in a management role or a technical one. I have done programming before in C, COBOL and scripting using VBScript (OS config automation stuff). My experience with C & COBOL was relatively simple, - not sure how I would take to more complex developement... and indeed whether that is the way to go. I regularly see contracts for javascript developers & what not for between £350 - £500 per day.
     
    For the moment, I'll continue to get a feel for Prince 2, and put some feelers out,.. then consider the programming route a little later
     
    #9
    stinking_dylan
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    Re: IT career advice... 2015/01/28 15:13:38 (permalink)
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    A lot of development which used to be outsourced to India is now returning to the UK due to the poor quality of the code.  It takes several years of iterative releases for this to become evident.
     
    If going the development route, your main issue would be a lack of object orientation design.  It's quite easy to pick up a new language, it's the design principles which are important.
     
    JavaScript is gaining a lot of popularity at the moment, but application development rather than website development (big difference).  This is due to the interfaces in IPTV set top boxes and TVs being written in js.
     
    If development is not you bag, then you could try testing?

    Lifter, runner and founder of nuutrii, a free recipe analyses tool for athletes.
    #10
    Bubba_Irl
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    Re: IT career advice... 2015/01/28 15:53:51 (permalink)
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    I am a .Net(C#) programmer with one of Americas Largest Insurance companies and i think the only thing i see being outsourced to India is the QC roles. There is always talk of development being moved across at some stage also but they said at the moment the development skills are sufficient for what they desire over there.
     
    In the future though i can see myself going down the BA or SA route, this then means if all dev goes to india or anywhere else, then i still have a role as these roles will be like a middle man between india and the US when it comes to the systems being designed and maintained :)
     
    An other role to consider is also Mobile apps development ... 3 years ago you wouldn't have been able to do half the stuff you can now do with your phone so picture what will happen in a few more years to come.
    #11
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