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Motorbike advice for a big bike virgin - WARNING! Graphic pics

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BigTom
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2006/07/07 01:04:59 (permalink)

Motorbike advice for a big bike virgin - WARNING! Graphic pics

Right, I'm thinking about getting a motorbike, but I need some sensible advice first please (I also need to do a CBT and take a test etc, so it's very early days - lol).

1. Loads of people I know have had nasty accidents on bikes, but a lot of these were when they were young (about 20ish). Are most accidents caused by the rider being a bellend, or is it just really fooking dangerous riding a bike?

2. I am heavy (over 19 stone) and have been advised to get a "sit up and beg" type bike to save my lower back. Any recommendations?

3. Are white lines really that dangerous in the rain? I mean, am I likely to nearly fall off just passing over one?

4. If I ride a bike like an old woman and enver go fast or do anything exciting and I ride mega defensively, is it still ludicrously dangerous due to other road users being cuunts?

As you can see, I know fcuk all about anything bike-related, but I intend to do plenty of research before even making the decision about whether or not to get a bike. However I am seriously considering getting one so any help would be gratefully received.
post edited by BigTom - 2006/07/07 13:15:52
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49 Replies Related Threads

    ajford1
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    RE: Motorbike advice for a big bike virgin 2006/07/07 02:17:29 (permalink)
    1) most accidents on a bike are caused by other road users usaually cars so technically u r just as likely 2 crash in ur car. the only difference being if u crash in a car ur a little more protected. if ur safe and confident on ur bike u wnt hav a problem. dnt let a safety issue put u off.
    2) i cnt suggest exactly what bike would be suitable but i wouldnt suggest a light 600cc or an R1. try looking into the sports tourers maybe.
    3) they are dangerous and u do hav to be careful but not to the extent where u will fall off if u drive on one.
    4) dnt worry about the safety, just ride safely, enjoy and hav fun ul b fine

    good luck
    i personally would get a honda blackbird
    #2
    paulb
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    RE: Motorbike advice for a big bike virgin 2006/07/07 02:30:34 (permalink)
    Be carefull on grids and manhole covers when its raining, i nearly come off once when i went over one in the rain, it's best to avoid them and go round them when wet.
    #3
    Fat Pete
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    RE: Motorbike advice for a big bike virgin 2006/07/07 08:10:24 (permalink)
    madness, madness, madness. Bikes are evil. Ditch the idea immediately. You're too fat, too old and too sensible. The weather is too ****e, the roads are too crowded, and most of all other drivers are too arrogant and too stupid. You clearly have too much money, please therefore send me a cheque for seventy pounds ( you know why ) and use the rest to buy Sonia something nice.

    Daftest idea I ever heard

    As far as I know, forgiveness is for the benefit of the person doing the forgiving, not the one being forgiven
    #4
    boar
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    RE: Motorbike advice for a big bike virgin 2006/07/07 09:31:44 (permalink)
    LMAO, ajford1 is your keyboard missing a few keys

    I agree with fatpete, bikes are safe enough but its the other divX's in the cars - the doddering 85 year old in his c reg metro,only 24000 miles on the clock , pulling out of a junction because , well , the eyes arent what they used to be.

    say goodbye to powerlifting tommy, and lots of other leg related activities*




    *i'm not saying this will happen,but tom,i'm all cried out.

    :Forever Boar:
    42min 10k
    6:39 2k rower 
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    18:48 69 mile ultra marathon
    #5
    BigTom
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    RE: Motorbike advice for a big bike virgin 2006/07/07 10:10:52 (permalink)
    Hmmm. Thanks for the input lads. Some serious food for thought from Pete and Boar (and you both know that stuff has already crossed my mind)...
    #6
    northern35s
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    RE: Motorbike advice for a big bike virgin 2006/07/07 10:38:01 (permalink)
    Wanted a big bike myself for years did the CBT and written test and then came to my senses, tooooooooo much can go wrong. there were three bikers in my year at college, not one of them made it into their twenties. A friend of mine got into big bikes in his thrities, got shut of it when he ended up wedged between a moving car and wall, very lucky to be alive.

    Then there is the guy I worked with he was taken out whilst waiting at a red light, by some to$$er who didn't see him waiting at the RED light, just plowed into the back of him and smashed both his legs and the wnaking to$$ing copper that arrived on the scene had the gaul to have a go at the lad for not wearing leathers????? WTF??????

    I could go on and I am sure most people know of someone who suffered a similar fate, it isn't worth it, oh and my lad was almost killed by the flying bike of some guy who lost his head when he hit a lampost, my son was pulled out of the way by his friends mother otherwise there would have been two deaths that day.

    DO NOT DO IT!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! As much as I would love to have a good fat hog to trundle the open roads, I couldn't do it to my loved ones.
    #7
    SatansJester
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    RE: Motorbike advice for a big bike virgin 2006/07/07 11:27:37 (permalink)
    Big Tom, Dont do it!! And while your at it stop driving a car, stop eating raw eggs, and stop crossing the road, ... in fact just stay in your house for the rest of your life just to make sure.
    If biking is done with the correct frame of mind (and it certainly sounds like BT has the right idea) and within skill limits it is very safe indeed, if all bikers died before they were 50 then Harley Davidson would be out of business wouldnt they?
    We can all get caught out by the tit in a car that is paying no attention, the only difference is that the consequenses are more serious for a biker, hence why i am now about 500% more alert as a road uses since i bought a motorbike.
    My advice, find a good training school, ask lots of questions, enjoy.
    As for what bike, depends on budget and your taste in bikes, considering your size (and im not taking the p*ss but a 600 supersport would be sheer hell for you) i would suggest a 1000cc upright bike such as Kawasaki Z1000, Yamaha MT01, Yamaha FZ1, Suzuki SV1000 or my personal favourite if you got the cash.... the Triumph Speed Triple -drooool
    #8
    BigTom
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    RE: Motorbike advice for a big bike virgin 2006/07/07 11:59:28 (permalink)
    Two very different points of view there! And I agree with both of them... I am a total p.ussy and would not be going fast or anything but even so, if some nutter runs me over when I'm waiting at the lights there's not much I an do about that...

    Not sure about budget, but I know I'd be spending nearly all of the money on top notch leathers, boots, helmet, gloves etc and much less on the bike.

    Still might not do it at all though...

    And SatansJester, I like the idea of staying in the house forever. Maybe I'll see if I can work from home.

    Forgot to mention, the bike would be used for a 30 mile each way commute mostly around the M25, so it has the potential to save a lot of time when all the cars are stationary.
    post edited by BigTom - 2006/07/07 12:00:04
    #9
    SteroidMan
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    RE: Motorbike advice for a big bike virgin 2006/07/07 12:33:41 (permalink)
    My father had a honda fireblade, he got killed on it when i was 10 years old.

    Me and my 9 year old sister had no dad and my mother was left widowed at the age of 30


    Dunno if you have kids or not Tom but if you in my case its not worth the risk to leave them without a dad.
    If you have a family then its definitly not worth the risk.

    I myself would like a small bike for the summer months and i dont have any1 that relies on me like kids but my family still simply wont allow it, my mother and sister get upset if i mention it so for there piece of mind i'm not gonna get 1.

    Still they are dangerous machines, how many times do you hear of people been killed or injured on them. Yes there are more car crashes but in comparison to how many cars are on the road to bikes then its a different story.

    If you think its worth the risk and dont have any1 depending on you then go for it, otherwise i'd take the safer option.
    #10
    SatansJester
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    RE: Motorbike advice for a big bike virgin 2006/07/07 12:50:57 (permalink)
    I can understand the reasons against and it is very upsetting to hear about stories like Steriodmans and one can only imagine the hurt it causes families when something bad happens.
    I have no kids etc and ride completely diferently to my mate who is married and has a kiddie, in fact its the first thing he thinks about when we talk about a risky or fast ride.
    Everyone is different and unless we have no friends or family and also blessed with Rossi's skill then your gonna have to look at your own circumstances and make an informed and cosidered decision on wether to go into biking.
    I would say BT that you dont need to spend vast sums on good leathers etc, after a certain price you just start paying for the name, you can get leathers for £400, Lid for £150, Boots for £60, gloves £30, back protector £60. This sort of gear will offer superb protection and not cost you loads.
    #11
    yiddo
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    RE: Motorbike advice for a big bike virgin 2006/07/07 13:04:43 (permalink)
    I have to say I would really advise against it
    I rode a 125 at 17 years old and did till I was 20 and got my driving license. I crashed about 10 times lol but nothing serious
    My bro on the other hand, is still recovering now from a crash last april.
    The carsh was in no way his fault, some pr!ck driving up the middle of the road on a 1000cc superbike thingy smashed straight into him as he was turning right, smashing his right leg to pieces
    The docs originally told my mum&dad that they wre going to amputate his leg wen he went into theatre, and if the crash had happened 5 years ago he would have lost his leg, but fortunately they managed to save it with a lot of skin, mucle & bone grafts (he no longer has any musle on the left side of his back as it is now on his leg)
    My point is you can be the safest rider on the road, and it takes one dickhead to come along and thats it ur fuct
    I really would give it some thought mate and I cant see how it is worth the risk after watching my bro struggle this last year because of someone elses stupidity on the road
    These pics may give u some idea of it
    Sorry of they are too graphic I'll take them down if necessary ;)





    #12
    Fat Pete
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    RE: Motorbike advice for a big bike virgin 2006/07/07 13:05:27 (permalink)

    ORIGINAL: FutureBatista

    but as jester said you can't go through your life avoiding risks.



    True, but risks can be variable in size. Efforts can be made to minimize them. We can all be killed on the roads, but the chances are higher if on a bike than if in a car.

    As far as I know, forgiveness is for the benefit of the person doing the forgiving, not the one being forgiven
    #13
    BigTom
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    RE: Motorbike advice for a big bike virgin 2006/07/07 13:09:45 (permalink)
    Sorry to hear your story SteroidMan. I was talking to my brother about it last night. He's got two small kids and that's part of the reason he no longer has a bike. I was thinking that just cos I don't have kids yet doesn't mean I value my life any less than if I did have kids. There's loads of stuff I still want to see and do and lifting (and competing) is very important to me, so at the moment I am erring towards NOT getting one... I genuinely don't know yet and I do appreciate all the comments.

    Good point about the fact that there are fewer bike riders when considering numbers of accidents. My girlfriend's brother is a copper with a bike (but doesn't ride a bike on duty) and I'm going to talk to him about it as he's obviously seen both the good and bad sides.
    #14
    blueseidboy
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    RE: Motorbike advice for a big bike virgin 2006/07/07 13:12:19 (permalink)
    if you have a fair bit of money to play with it may be worth considering a track day toy?
    quite a few of my dads mates only ride track days now as the roads are too dangerous and these are people who live and breathe bikes (work in bsb, wsb, motogp etc)

    #15
    GTM
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    RE: Motorbike advice for a big bike virgin 2006/07/07 13:14:25 (permalink)

    ORIGINAL: BigTom

    Right, I'm thinking about getting a motorbike, but I need some sensible advice first please (I also need to do a CBT and take a test etc, so it's very early days - lol).

    1. Loads of people I know have had nasty accidents on bikes, but a lot of these were when they were young (about 20ish). Are most accidents caused by the rider being a bellend, or is it just really fooking dangerous riding a bike?

    2. I am heavy (over 19 stone) and have been advised to get a "sit up and beg" type bike to save my lower back. Any recommendations?

    3. Are white lines really that dangerous in the rain? I mean, am I likely to nearly fall off just passing over one?

    4. If I ride a bike like an old woman and enver go fast or do anything exciting and I ride mega defensively, is it still ludicrously dangerous due to other road users being cuunts?

    As you can see, I know fcuk all about anything bike-related, but I intend to do plenty of research before even making the decision about whether or not to get a bike. However I am seriously considering getting one so any help would be gratefully received.



    Well what can I say. As a (ex) biker I am obviously biased and don't think that the risks outweigh the advantages. I'll start off by answering your questions.

    1) Despite what we might percieve as bikers, (ie it's all the car drivers fault), the facts just don't back us up. The statistics show that the single largest reason for injury and death amongst bikers is inappropriate use of excessive speed in the DRY in the wrong place at the wrong time. As well as excessive risk taking when it comes to overtaking.
    Of course car drivers are the cause of a significant no of accidents involving motorcycles, they simply don't look out for us consciously. But this issue is nearly completely erradicated IMO as long as you assume all car drivers are blind and act accordingly. I'm dead serious here. Expecting car drivers to act like you are another car is a BIG mistake. Assume they do NOT know you are there and keep your distance and chant the motorcycle mantra. observation, observation, observation. Ride defensively.

    2) The only real sit up and beg bikes around are customs. If you like them then you're ok. Otherwise your best bet is to get a decent middleweight commuter like a Hornet or Fazer. Though to be honest I would strongly recommend getting something smaller & less powerful for the first year or two (like a Honda CB500).

    3) White lines should be treated with caution in the wet. No you won't fall over if you drive straight over them completly upright. But hit them when you're leaning over or braking and you're in for a bit of a scare at the least, going to come off at the worst. Essentially in the wet you want to stick to tarmac where ever possible. Avoid anything shiny at all costs. Avoid all road markings and covers etc etc etc.

    4) Simple answer to this question is no, it's not ludicrously dangerous. As a biker you are not significantly more likely to have an accident if you ride "normally" (ie behave as other road users are expecting you to behave), but if you do have an accident you are significantly more likely to get hurt. How badly you get hurt depends very much on just how fast you are going, if you hit anything when you come off and luck.


    I rode for 12 years, mostly in London, and I had a total of 3 accidents.

    1st one was as a learner where I was inexperienced when a car stopped in front of me. I panicked and locked up the front wheel and fell off.

    2nd was when a car pulled out in front of me. He was well ahead of me but I was going faster than I should have been, but even so I was unlucky because I was breaking quite hard when I hit a pedestrian crossing. I lost the front end because of the instant change from shellgrip (a very grippy surface) to painted tar, (not that great grip wise), and down I went.

    3rd time I was cornering on the inside of a bus. I was so intent on making sure I didn't pull out from behind the bus in to oncomming traffic that I wasn't looking at what the traffic in front of me was doing. When I did look back round a car had stopped dead in front of me, (I was crossing behind him - if that makes any sense), and i clipped the back corner of the car and was thrown to the ground.

    In all 3 cases the speed I was actually traveling at when I came off was under 20 mph and I didn't hit anything with any significant force, (except in the second one where the bike bruised my foot a bit as it landed on it).

    We've all heard horror stories but I can honestly say that nearly everyone I've ever heard the biker was at least partially to blame.

    So how dangerous is motorcycling? Well I would say that to a large extent it's as dangerous as you make it !!
    If you overtake before blind corners and brows of hills or fly round blind corners at speed you are going to end up seriously hurt or dead eventually. It's all about probabilities, one day there will be an on-coming vehicle round that corner or over that hill.


    GTM

    Just because one can't understand a concept, doesn't mean that it is wrong.
    #16
    BigTom
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    RE: Motorbike advice for a big bike virgin 2006/07/07 13:15:09 (permalink)
    Fcuking Hell! Just seen your post yiddo. Hope your brother gets better, but he's clearly never going to be 100%.

    I'll edit the title to warn about the graphic pics, but I thnik they should stay in. I am now very scared...
    #17
    BigTom
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    RE: Motorbike advice for a big bike virgin 2006/07/07 13:19:37 (permalink)
    Thanks a lot for that post GTM. It agrees with a lot of assumptions I had made about biking.
    #18
    GTM
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    RE: Motorbike advice for a big bike virgin 2006/07/07 13:30:46 (permalink)

    ORIGINAL: BigTom

    Fcuking Hell! Just seen your post yiddo. Hope your brother gets better, but he's clearly never going to be 100%.

    I'll edit the title to warn about the graphic pics, but I thnik they should stay in. I am now very scared...



    BT,

    Those pictures are horrific there is no doubt about it but I'm going to be brutally honest here and say they at best scare mongering. You can see plenty of pictures off the net of the results of car accidents showing people mangled in car accidents. I've seen burnt out and smashed up cars with dead bodies inside WITH MY OWN EYES. So what? Any road vehicle is dangerous if you drive stupidly and even when you don't there is a risk involved. Yes motorcycles are a higher risk, no-one with any sense is ever going to deny that but pictures like those don't prove anything IMO, (sorry yiddo - I know you're only relating a very hurtful situation and I don't mean to be disrespectful to you or your brother in any way).


    GTM

    Just because one can't understand a concept, doesn't mean that it is wrong.
    #19
    yiddo
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    RE: Motorbike advice for a big bike virgin 2006/07/07 13:37:34 (permalink)
    I understand ur point GTM
    My point is tho that u can be as safe a rider as u possibly can be, and still get injured/killed because of some1 elses careless riding
    I agree with u about the defensive riding point tho, same as what my Dad taught me; assume no1 has seen u and assume every driving is basically an idiot and will potentially cause u to crash
    I suppose the pics are scare mongering slightly, just trying to hammer my POV home i suppose, as I have seen first hand the devestating effects of a bike accident (caused by some1 else)
    As for lifting and competing Tom, even a very minor crash, say coming off going too fast around a corner due to inexperience, could injure ur arm/leg etc and stop u being able to do these thing
    #20
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