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Pyrimiding your weights??

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Archie130979
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2005/07/28 19:44:34 (permalink)
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Pyrimiding your weights??

Was just looking for peoples views on pyrimiding. Or is it better to use a conatant weight throuout your exercise?
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    welsh flex
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    RE: Pyrimiding your weights?? 2005/07/28 20:00:09 (permalink)
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    i normally pyramid 12, 10 , 8, 6, 12 adding to the weight all the way to 6 and then dropping the weight to get atleast 12 out at the end of the final set
    #2
    big49ersfan
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    RE: Pyrimiding your weights?? 2005/07/29 00:04:22 (permalink)
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    i see what i did the previous week e.g. benched 120kg 8 times then i will put on 125 and aim for 8 this week. Ifi hit less than 6 i will drop back to 125.5 if i hit between 6 and 8 i will keep the weight the same and more than 8 i will add more weight.

    Do this for a given number of sets on bench for example it would be 3 if i was aiming to get bigger
    #3
    rogerthedog
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    RE: Pyrimiding your weights?? 2005/07/29 00:19:35 (permalink)
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    I have never really understood the concept of pyramiding.
    It's fairly common though.
    When you get to your heaviest and toughest set you've already done 3 or 4 sets.
    I prefer doing 3 or 4 warm ups - low reps - and then hit the heavy weight relatively fresh.

    There's always reverse pyramid too - subsequent sets getting lighter...
    #4
    warrden1
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    RE: Pyrimiding your weights?? 2005/07/30 02:39:52 (permalink)
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    Not to be smart, but the purpose of the pyramid is to get to your heaviest point and then work back to your lightest. I used it for a long time and it works great, it's probably where I gained most of my strength.

    1
    2 2
    4 4
    6 6
    8 8
    10 10

    My 1 rep is 350 lbs and my down side 10 reps is a actually a burn out.



    #5
    warrden1
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    RE: Pyrimiding your weights?? 2005/07/30 02:41:34 (permalink)
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    The forum jacked my pretty pyramid of numbers. They were supposed to be in the shape of a pyramid. Hents the name, pyramid.
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    tokar
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    RE: Pyrimiding your weights?? 2005/08/01 15:50:08 (permalink)
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    ORIGINAL: warrden1

    Not to be smart, but the purpose of the pyramid is to get to your heaviest point and then work back to your lightest. I used it for a long time and it works great, it's probably where I gained most of my strength.

    1
    2 2
    4 4
    6 6
    8 8
    10 10

    My 1 rep is 350 lbs and my down side 10 reps is a actually a burn out.






    As logical as it sounds, this isn't actually what is usually referred to as pyramiding. What is meant by it is increasing the weight on the bar, while decreasing the number of reps, with each successive set. I think the origin of the term is this: if you imagine a pyramid, the height axis represents the weight used, while the surface area of the cross-section represents the number of reps.

    Although I'm fairly sure this is where the term comes from, it is now often used to refer simply to doing successive sets with increased weight, which has no connection with a pyramid whatsoever. I agree your scheme makes good sense of the term, but I've never heard it used. Often increasing the reps and decreasing the weight on successive sets is referred to as a "reverse pyramid".
    #7
    warrden1
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    RE: Pyrimiding your weights?? 2005/08/08 02:31:46 (permalink)
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    ORIGINAL: tokar



    As logical as it sounds, this isn't actually what is usually referred to as pyramiding. What is meant by it is increasing the weight on the bar, while decreasing the number of reps, with each successive set. I think the origin of the term is this: if you imagine a pyramid, the height axis represents the weight used, while the surface area of the cross-section represents the number of reps.




    It sounds like yours and mine are the same.

    10 reps at 225 lbs
    8 @ 275
    6 @ 295
    4 @ 315
    2 @ 335
    1 @ 355
    2 @ 335
    4 @ 315
    6 @ 295
    8 @ 275
    10 @ 225

    This is reducing reps while adding weight.
    #8
    rogerthedog
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    RE: Pyrimiding your weights?? 2005/08/08 02:43:49 (permalink)
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    It sounds like yours and mine are the same.

    10 reps at 225 lbs
    8 @ 275
    6 @ 295
    4 @ 315
    2 @ 335
    1 @ 355
    2 @ 335
    4 @ 315
    6 @ 295
    8 @ 275
    10 @ 225

    This is reducing reps while adding weight.


    A pyramid as done in most gyms would actually only be this bit of it:
    8 @ 275
    6 @ 295
    4 @ 315
    2 @ 335
    1 @ 355
    though I haven't met many people who pyramid to singles. The reps I've seen done are more like 12, 10, 8 and 6 or something similar.

    post edited by rogerthedog - 2005/08/08 02:44:50
    #9
    warrden1
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    RE: Pyrimiding your weights?? 2005/08/08 02:58:06 (permalink)
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    ORIGINAL: rogerthedog


    A pyramid as done in most gyms would actually only be this bit of it:
    8 @ 275
    6 @ 295
    4 @ 315
    2 @ 335
    1 @ 355


    This would just be adding weight and reducing reps, which is very common. What makes the other a pyramid is that you go down the other side, reducing weight while increasing reps also the hardest part of the workout. Its meant to be a long and intense workout. And anyone that is trying to maintain muscle while shedding some fat really should try it for a while. I personally, had no problems doing this a couple time a week but people can change it and make it what ever they want.
    #10
    rogerthedog
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    RE: Pyrimiding your weights?? 2005/08/08 03:42:40 (permalink)
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    This would just be adding weight and reducing reps, which is very common

    Yes, and commonly known as pyramidding.

    Your point of view is fair enough but calling it a pyramid is just confusing.
    Perhaps we need a different name for your routine style
    #11
    tokar
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    RE: Pyrimiding your weights?? 2005/08/08 15:30:05 (permalink)
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    As rogerthedog says, "just adding weight and reducing reps" is exactly what most people are talking about when they refer to "pyramiding".

    In common parlance, your workout would be pyramiding followed by reverse pyramiding.
    #12
    warrden1
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    RE: Pyrimiding your weights?? 2005/08/09 00:37:12 (permalink)
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    My mistake ya'll, I thought it was called pyramiding because you work from high reps to low reps and back to high reps. The low rep being the high weight and top of the pyramid.

    I've never heard of a reverse pyramid and really don't see what the point of it would be if it were not preceded by a pyramid or tacked on to the end of a 5X5 etc. And I guess that's why your version (to me) looks like half a pyramid. So Rogerthedog is right I need a name for it. Either a "pyramid followed by a reverse pyramid" or "that ridiculously long bench workout".
    #13
    tokar
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    RE: Pyrimiding your weights?? 2005/08/10 00:07:04 (permalink)
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    ORIGINAL: warrden1

    My mistake ya'll, I thought it was called pyramiding because you work from high reps to low reps and back to high reps. The low rep being the high weight and top of the pyramid.

    I've never heard of a reverse pyramid and really don't see what the point of it would be if it were not preceded by a pyramid or tacked on to the end of a 5X5 etc. And I guess that's why your version (to me) looks like half a pyramid. So Rogerthedog is right I need a name for it. Either a "pyramid followed by a reverse pyramid" or "that ridiculously long bench workout".


    A lot of people think "reverse pyramiding" is good for "getting a burn", and rubbish like that.

    Sheiko actually uses the technique, whatever you want to call it, for bench press, in a lot of his routines on www.worldpowerlifting.com. Good way of getting plenty of volume into a workout.
    #14
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