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Repititions methodolgy

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Wormdoggy
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2004/03/16 21:29:21 (permalink)
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Repititions methodolgy

I know this could be a silly question, but I just wanted to clarify repititions and the methodology.

The higher the repititions say 10-15 the leaner the muscle gets but very little growth. The lower the repititions say 5-6 , the bigger and stronger the muscle gets but develops not as lean?

This question was prompted because I have read several workout routines on this web page, Tony Starks being the latest and have found that routines vary in repititions. In most cases isolation routines are with higher reps while compound routines are lower repititions.

If your were to have one guy workout with higher reps for a year and have another guys workout woth lower reps for a year using the same routines, what would be the results? Assuming diet was exactly the same.


Cheers
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    PikeKing
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    RE: Repititions methodolgy 2004/03/16 21:59:06 (permalink)
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    quote:

    The higher the repititions say 10-15 the leaner the muscle gets but very little growth. The lower the repititions say 5-6 , the bigger and stronger the muscle gets but develops not as lean?



    no, the reps in the 5-6 range will probably produce better mass gains and definately better strength gains. The reps in the 10-15 will not produce muscle that is any leaner than that of the lower reps. You're not going to produce fatty muscle, as thats what less lean would mean. I think maybe you have been biten by the spot reduction bug. The higher reps will increase resting muscle tone, increase strength endurance, the mass and strength gains will not be the same as that of the lower reps.

    They guy training with the lower reps would probably gain more muscle mass over the year. There are a lot of variables though, genetic potential, muscle fibre type dominance etc... that would need to be accounted for.
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    Wormdoggy
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    RE: Repititions methodolgy 2004/03/16 22:32:15 (permalink)
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    Thanks Pike, however, I just found this article on scientific news....not sure if you are saying the same thig. At the bottom of this report was Tonystarks email address. Don't know if he wrote this?

    1–5 Reps = Maximal strength increases through enhanced neural drive
    6–8 Reps = Optimal compromise of maximal strength and hypertrophy gains
    9–12 Reps = Maximal hypertrophy gains leading to increased maximal strength
    13–20 Reps = Strength-endurance gains and lower hypertrophy gains

    Using this table we can see that the best gains in strength are made using very low reps (1 to 5) whilst the best gains in muscle size (hypertrophy) are made using medium to high reps (6 to 12).

    The weight you lift will be dictated by the rep range you choose. If you are looking to gain muscle size you would select a weight that allowed you to perform between 6 and 12 reps. For the most part, though
    higher reps (8-12) works more toward gaining muscle mass,and does less toward gaining motor unit efficiency (so you'll get bigger faster than you'll get stronger.Lower reps (<5) works more toward improvements in neurological functioning, and less toward muscle mass, so you'll get stronger faster than you'll get bigger.

    Cheers

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    shreklikedave
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    RE: Repititions methodolgy 2004/03/17 08:16:27 (permalink)
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    quote:
    Originally posted by Wormdoggy



    1–5 Reps = Maximal strength increases through enhanced neural drive
    6–8 Reps = Optimal compromise of maximal strength and hypertrophy gains
    9–12 Reps = Maximal hypertrophy gains leading to increased maximal strength
    13–20 Reps = Strength-endurance gains and lower hypertrophy gains

    Using this table we can see that the best gains in strength are made using very low reps (1 to 5) whilst the best gains in muscle size (hypertrophy) are made using medium to high reps (6 to 12).







    Do not go up to 12 for strength or size or anything else other than maybe a change now and then. I wouldnt go any higher than 8 as far as reps grow and find the best response in terms of growth to be between 4 and 6 reps

    It would be intersting to read the whole study from which the table was derived. However it seems logical that if someone is training at 1-5 reps and therefore using a heavier weight that they will get stronger than someone using higher reps with less weight.

    As far as growth is concerned that depends much more on diet than rep range
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    PikeKing
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    RE: Repititions methodolgy 2004/03/17 08:26:15 (permalink)
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    that looks like something that ACSM or NSCA put out, I have that read before somewhere.
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