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Roseta Stone Language Learning

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NuttySS
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2014/11/22 17:45:19 (permalink)

Roseta Stone Language Learning

Has anyone ever tried these?  Always wanted to learn another language and did take lessons for a while although they didn't fit in with my schedule too well so they faded out.
 
Always see plenty of adverts about Roseta Stone but I wonder how effective they are?
#1

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    sillynarbie
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    Re: Roseta Stone Language Learning 2014/11/23 09:14:29 (permalink)
    It's a waste of time and money.
     
    Best thing to do is to learn the grammar of a language, which for most languages you can do in 10 or so hours, and then vocabulary later. Rosetta Stone starts with vocabulary. I have never understood why the first words it teaches you are horse/cat/car, when what you really want to be able to do is to conjugate a verb with some pronouns: "I can't do it" or something else useful.
     
    To that end, I highly recommend Michel Thomas's CD's. If you do the foundation + advanced CDs then you'll know the entire grammar (past,present,future,subjunctive tenses etc.) and around 50 verbs, including the most common irregular ones, and how to use pronouns. There is almost no vocabulary in the CDs though so you'll need to learn that later and it means that you don't learn things like declension of nouns (e.g. German). But that's something you can pick up later.
     
    If you can learn the grammar + 1000 of the most common words (check out the frequency dictionaries on amazon) then you will understand 85% of everything you read in that language.
     
    But really whether you succeed or not is nothing to do with rosetta stone.
     
    Depending on the language you learn it can take anywhere from 500 hours (French, Spanish) to 2000 hours (Arabic, Mandarin) to gain proficiency in the language. And that is proper studying, not passively listening to a Spanish song or casually reading a book (if you read the book with a dictionary and add vocab onto flash cards, that's OK). So you really need to be motivated to do it.
     
     
     
    post edited by sillynarbie - 2014/11/23 09:16:12
    #2
    Dumbat
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    Re: Roseta Stone Language Learning 2014/11/23 10:22:04 (permalink)
    I agree with Sillynarbie: Michel Thomas`s language courses are highly effective.
     
    They are based on the way that we all learn languages naturally.

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    #3
    Sideeffectwhu
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    Re: Roseta Stone Language Learning 2014/11/23 12:11:21 (permalink)
    Any decent sites to learn english at 51 im still struggling.

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    #4
    Calza
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    Re: Roseta Stone Language Learning 2014/11/23 13:45:04 (permalink)
    I thought it was ok when I done it.
     
    I started learning Russian and I firmly believe if I'd stuck at it and put the work in I'd have a reasonable base to go off (but I didn't, and I don't!).

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    #5
    turkeyjoe
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    Re: Roseta Stone Language Learning 2014/11/23 14:41:17 (permalink)
    plenty of free courses on youtube
    #6
    doc
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    Re: Roseta Stone Language Learning 2014/11/24 16:25:33 (permalink)
    sillynarbie
    It's a waste of time and money.
     
    Best thing to do is to learn the grammar of a language, which for most languages you can do in 10 or so hours, and then vocabulary later. Rosetta Stone starts with vocabulary. I have never understood why the first words it teaches you are horse/cat/car, when what you really want to be able to do is to conjugate a verb with some pronouns: "I can't do it" or something else useful.
     
    To that end, I highly recommend Michel Thomas's CD's. If you do the foundation + advanced CDs then you'll know the entire grammar (past,present,future,subjunctive tenses etc.) and around 50 verbs, including the most common irregular ones, and how to use pronouns. There is almost no vocabulary in the CDs though so you'll need to learn that later and it means that you don't learn things like declension of nouns (e.g. German). But that's something you can pick up later.
     
    If you can learn the grammar + 1000 of the most common words (check out the frequency dictionaries on amazon) then you will understand 85% of everything you read in that language.
     
    But really whether you succeed or not is nothing to do with rosetta stone.
     
    Depending on the language you learn it can take anywhere from 500 hours (French, Spanish) to 2000 hours (Arabic, Mandarin) to gain proficiency in the language. And that is proper studying, not passively listening to a Spanish song or casually reading a book (if you read the book with a dictionary and add vocab onto flash cards, that's OK). So you really need to be motivated to do it.
     
     
     


    did you manage to become fluent in another language ? I too fell at the hurdle of having my vocab stuffed with useless words that where rarely used and just made it harder , although once I knew a sentence to put it in it became a lot more relevant and more memorable .
     
    I might start learning again , would love to learn and carry on with Spanish , but I think Russian and mandarin will be more useful.
    #7
    Greyphantom
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    Re: Roseta Stone Language Learning 2014/11/24 17:18:13 (permalink)
    Actually I think they arent too bad and one of the better ones... learning grammar in 10 hours is a neat trick... especially in Russian or Chinese (which a lot of people will say has no grammar.... pfffft) personally I think learn both together is the way forward...
    #8
    Rasputin
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    Re: Roseta Stone Language Learning 2014/11/24 20:03:44 (permalink)
    Can you get this stuff free? I don't fancy forking out for it without a decent trial. 
     
    I would very much like to learn a bit of Italian. 

    Ra Ra Rasputin lover of the Russian Queen, Ra Ra Ra Rasputin Russia's greatest love machine (Allegedly)
    #9
    sillynarbie
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    Re: Roseta Stone Language Learning 2014/11/25 01:28:33 (permalink)
    Rasputin
    Can you get this stuff free? I don't fancy forking out for it without a decent trial. 
     
    I would very much like to learn a bit of Italian. 




    There are ways to acquire it ;-)
    #10
    sillynarbie
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    Re: Roseta Stone Language Learning 2014/11/25 01:31:03 (permalink)
    Greyphantom
    Actually I think they arent too bad and one of the better ones... learning grammar in 10 hours is a neat trick... especially in Russian or Chinese (which a lot of people will say has no grammar.... pfffft) personally I think learn both together is the way forward...




    I did the Michel Thomas Russian Beginners + Advanced CD before I went to Georgia and learnt the grammar in around 10 hours. Russian grammar is not so bad except for the cases and the declensions, but conjugating verbs + sentence structure is no more difficult than German, and actually it only has a couple more cases than German does anyway.
     
    You can also learn the alphabet in about 5 minutes if you already know some of the greek letters (as a scientist, it eased the transition quite a lot): http://gadling.com/2009/03/30/gadling-teaches-you-to-read-the-cyrillic-alphabet-in-5-minutes/

    Russian takes around 1100 hours for a native English person to learn proficiently, which is about twice that of French and Spanish but only around 300 mores than German. It is not as bad as everyone makes out. Mandarin, on the other hand, is pretty solid.
    post edited by sillynarbie - 2014/11/25 01:38:05
    #11
    sillynarbie
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    Re: Roseta Stone Language Learning 2014/11/25 01:33:15 (permalink)
    doc
    sillynarbie
    It's a waste of time and money.
     
    Best thing to do is to learn the grammar of a language, which for most languages you can do in 10 or so hours, and then vocabulary later. Rosetta Stone starts with vocabulary. I have never understood why the first words it teaches you are horse/cat/car, when what you really want to be able to do is to conjugate a verb with some pronouns: "I can't do it" or something else useful.
     
    To that end, I highly recommend Michel Thomas's CD's. If you do the foundation + advanced CDs then you'll know the entire grammar (past,present,future,subjunctive tenses etc.) and around 50 verbs, including the most common irregular ones, and how to use pronouns. There is almost no vocabulary in the CDs though so you'll need to learn that later and it means that you don't learn things like declension of nouns (e.g. German). But that's something you can pick up later.
     
    If you can learn the grammar + 1000 of the most common words (check out the frequency dictionaries on amazon) then you will understand 85% of everything you read in that language.
     
    But really whether you succeed or not is nothing to do with rosetta stone.
     
    Depending on the language you learn it can take anywhere from 500 hours (French, Spanish) to 2000 hours (Arabic, Mandarin) to gain proficiency in the language. And that is proper studying, not passively listening to a Spanish song or casually reading a book (if you read the book with a dictionary and add vocab onto flash cards, that's OK). So you really need to be motivated to do it.
     
     
     


    did you manage to become fluent in another language ? I too fell at the hurdle of having my vocab stuffed with useless words that where rarely used and just made it harder , although once I knew a sentence to put it in it became a lot more relevant and more memorable .
     
    I might start learning again , would love to learn and carry on with Spanish , but I think Russian and mandarin will be more useful.




    I'm not fluent yet but I haven't moved yet. I'll be living there for two years so if I'm not fluent by the time I get back I'd deserve shooting. I'll let you know how it goes.
    #12
    Furious D
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    Re: Roseta Stone Language Learning 2014/11/25 12:23:04 (permalink)
    I agree with Sillynarbie. You should focus on grammar and not vocabulary when learning a language.

    I used to teach English in Japan and so have a lot of experience of speaking with Japanese people who have a good English vocabulary but no idea how to communicate in English due to a lack of grammar knowledge. On the other hand, I learned to speak Japanese pretty fluently in the space of a few months by focusing on the grammar. Of course there are many topics that I cannot talk about, because I do not know the subject specific vocabulary, but I can communicate effectively. A big advantage that I have is that I can usually rely on the Japanese knowledge of English vocabulary to fill the holes in my Japanese vocabulary.

    To get off the ground you need to know the pronouns, and a handful of common vowels, nouns and adjectives.

    Then learn the grammar for:
    (noun or prounoun) is (noun or adjective)
    Simple subject verb object sentences
    (noun or pronou) is more/less (adjective) than (noun or pronoun)
    I like... Do you like...?
    I have... Have you ever...?
    ... Because/so...

    Add to that a few stock phrases like greetings, please and thank you and it is amazing how quickly you will take off.

    Once you've mastered the basic grammar, then adding new vocabulary is just a case of memorising it and slotting it in, and more complicated grammatical forms can be added as you need them.
    #13
    ukmachine
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    Re: Roseta Stone Language Learning 2014/11/25 14:12:07 (permalink)
    Assimil is a great resource.
    #14
    PosterBoy
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    Re: Roseta Stone Language Learning 2014/11/25 14:47:43 (permalink)
    italki.com is a good website for finding and arranging lessons with online teachers.
     
    I used Rosetta Stone and it had some use, as did pimsleur. 
    post edited by PosterBoy - 2014/11/25 14:49:02
    #15
    cgmd1
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    Re: Roseta Stone Language Learning 2014/11/25 15:04:20 (permalink)
    Try Duolingo, free app for phone or tablet.
     
    I've been using it to learn Spanish for a few months and find it vey good. Would it get you fluent? Unlikely. But its a damn good start and its free.
     
    The way it teaches is good too. A mix of listening, repeating and translating

    Never put your hand where you wouldn't put your face
    #16
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