YB
BannerBanner

Squat problem

Page: 12 > Showing page 1 of 2
Author
rob26
New Member
  • Total Posts : 14
  • Reward points: 2880
  • Joined: 2009/04/25 15:34:04
  • Status: offline
2011/03/17 17:20:29 (permalink)

Squat problem

Having some problems while squatting.
 
When I squat my heels want to rise above my toes and to compensate keeping my feet flat I end up arching my back alot and have started to feel more and more uncomfortable as the weights get biggger. Just wondered if anyone had any ideas/solutions to this.
 
Thanks in advance.
#1

37 Replies Related Threads

    USA DEALS
    theITman
    Pro-Member
    • Total Posts : 4846
    • Reward points: 2228
    • Joined: 2009/12/22 22:25:44
    • Location: Trapped in a box!
    • Status: offline
    Re:Squat problem 2011/03/17 17:25:42 (permalink)
    If your form is ok with less weight, then the problem is the weight.
     
    Decrease it!
    #2
    rob26
    New Member
    • Total Posts : 14
    • Reward points: 2880
    • Joined: 2009/04/25 15:34:04
    • Status: offline
    Re:Squat problem 2011/03/17 17:38:09 (permalink)
    Hmmm could be, but yes the weight is challenging but i dont feel as if im going silly i can still complete a set of 8 reps just a small niggle through the set thats uncomfortable.
     
    To be fair I dont think i have the hamstring flexibility for squats i cant even touch my toes from standing! Annoyingly this isnt a quick fix though.
    #3
    Fat Pete
    Pro-Member
    • Total Posts : 15771
    • Reward points: 10917
    • Joined: 2004/08/05 07:52:54
    • Location: A pie shop in the North West
    • Status: offline
    Re:Squat problem 2011/03/17 17:45:29 (permalink)
    Place a small piece of wood under the heels and as you progress use thinner and thinner pieces

    As far as I know, forgiveness is for the benefit of the person doing the forgiving, not the one being forgiven
    #4
    scruffy
    Moderator
    • Total Posts : 4921
    • Reward points: 12791
    • Joined: 2001/09/03 23:09:18
    • Location: United Kingdom
    • Status: offline
    Re:Squat problem 2011/03/17 18:00:45 (permalink)
    try some box squats,,, how high do you have the bar on the back ???
    #5
    GT_PT
    Olympian Member
    • Total Posts : 552
    • Reward points: 4881
    • Joined: 2008/04/11 13:29:00
    • Status: offline
    Re:Squat problem 2011/03/17 18:12:01 (permalink)
    Rob,
     
    You may not have tight hamstrings, it could be hip flexors, piriformis or any number of compensations.  If you can get an assessment done to check then it would be of benefit to you. 
     
    If not then raising your heels up as Fate Pete said will help you get deeper in the squat with good form.... but this wont address any imbalances in the pelvis for example.
     
    GT

    EX Personal Trainer and Biomechanics Coach!
    Now a corporate boy!!!!
    #6
    SecondRow
    Olympian Member
    • Total Posts : 874
    • Reward points: 4069
    • Joined: 2005/12/27 21:44:58
    • Status: offline
    Re:Squat problem 2011/03/17 18:24:45 (permalink)
    sounds like you're rolling forward to me, the arching of your back is instinctive in order to move your centre of gravity backwards and keep you from falling forward, which suggests one of three things to me; the bar is too far forward in relation to your heels, your glutes and/or hamstrings are not strong enough for the weight you are squatting, or your technique isn't solid.
     
    When you sink to the floor, do your hips move first, or your knees?
     
    Personally I think putting a plate under your heels is not a great idea if you want to squat over the long term, but I guess it depends what you want out of it.

    Current training: 6-day split
    Current cycle: Test E @ 500mg per week

    Current stats:
    Height : 192cm
    Weight : 272lbs
    Body Fat : 15.4%
    #7
    TheThumper
    Pro-Member
    • Total Posts : 2454
    • Reward points: 5795
    • Joined: 2009/07/30 11:29:41
    • Status: offline
    Re:Squat problem 2011/03/17 20:18:02 (permalink)
    I think putting something under the heels may reinforce the distribution of weight to the 'balls' of the feet; I'd get the shoes off and focus on driving through the heels, the arch of the foot will flatten out to absorb some of the weight. Push the knees out if they tend to drift inside the line.
     
    Sometimes ankle flexibility (tight tibialis anterior) can cause some shift of the weight forward on the foot. Try ironing this out before you squat.
     
    This is a good prehab routine to run through before you squat;
     
    http://www.defrancostraining.com/ask_joe/archives/ask_joe_08-10-03.html#question04
     
    There's another one I'll try to find, I can't find the link right now.
    post edited by TheThumper - 2011/03/17 20:20:01

    "If the traps contract and the arms bend, you must descend" 
      
    Currently listening to - Suncatcher - End of Year Countdown 2015 on ah.fm - http://yousaved.it/Tyk

    #8
    Rachfit
    Pro-Member
    • Total Posts : 3377
    • Reward points: 4229
    • Joined: 2009/10/21 16:14:24
    • Location: Nottingham
    • Status: offline
    Re:Squat problem 2011/03/17 22:04:33 (permalink)
    If you think you have tight hams have you been trying to stretch them? if so how long for and have you noticed any change?
    (something under your heels is a safe idea for the short term as fatpete suggests)

    "If you cant explain it simply, you dont understand it well enough" Albert Einstein
    Rach
    DipITS MBCA
    Specialist Biomechanics Coach 
     
    #9
    Bollard
    Pro-Member
    • Total Posts : 1891
    • Reward points: 4584
    • Joined: 2008/01/16 11:39:24
    • Status: offline
    Re:Squat problem 2011/03/18 12:54:05 (permalink)
    Also, are you squatting barefoot and really driving your heels down as you push out?
     
    I find that trainers increase the tendency to roll onto the toes in the latter (higher) part of the squat. Barefoot remedies this.
    #10
    PL
    New Member
    • Total Posts : 39
    • Reward points: 2396
    • Joined: 2011/02/24 09:34:27
    • Location: Hampshire
    • Status: offline
    Re:Squat problem 2011/03/18 13:22:05 (permalink)
    Hi
     
    I posted near enough the exact same question on the female section the other day!  I have the same problem and think it is tight hamstrings, as even with a 20 kg bar I end up with my back nearly horizontal and the only way I can get low is to go on my toes.  It was suggested to me to try plates/plank under my heels and I think this will work.  I have also seen some squat shoes which I might invest in but I don't know much about them.  Hope you find a way that works for you.
     
    Good luck, take care
    x
    #11
    HicSuntDracones
    Pro-Member
    • Total Posts : 1107
    • Reward points: 4652
    • Joined: 2009/05/13 13:12:58
    • Location: Near Warrington
    • Status: offline
    Re:Squat problem 2011/03/18 13:41:58 (permalink)
    I tried the object under your heels trick at Yoga last week (doing bodyweight only squats though!) and was amazed at how much difference it made to the depth I could squat to.
     
    When I squat with a barbell I do so wearing vibram fivefingers (so very close to barefoot) and can't get any lower than parallel. It's made me want to try a squat with my heels raised a cm or two to see what BB squatting is like with more depth.
    #12
    infidel
    Pro-Member
    • Total Posts : 1854
    • Reward points: 5032
    • Joined: 2008/06/25 22:07:16
    • Status: offline
    Re:Squat problem 2011/03/18 15:31:13 (permalink)
    GT_PT

    Rob,

    You may not have tight hamstrings, it could be hip flexors, piriformis or any number of compensations.  If you can get an assessment done to check then it would be of benefit to you. 

    If not then raising your heels up as Fate Pete said will help you get deeper in the squat with good form.... but this wont address any imbalances in the pelvis for example.

    GT

    so, if there are imbalances in the pelvis, what can be done
    to correct it?
    #13
    rob26
    New Member
    • Total Posts : 14
    • Reward points: 2880
    • Joined: 2009/04/25 15:34:04
    • Status: offline
    Re:Squat problem 2011/03/18 16:13:15 (permalink)
    Rachfit 
    If you think you have tight hams have you been trying to stretch them? if so how long for and have you noticed any change? 

     
    Not yet, but having read alot on forums, articles etc a common issue is tight hams. As I mentioned before this could be it as I can't touch my toes from standing...not even close actually. 
     
    I think ill start stretching them frequently to see if this helps
    scruffy
    try some box squats,,, how high do you have the bar on the back ???

    The bars sat on my traps? Pretty much as high as i could get it?
    SecondRow
    When you sink to the floor, do your hips move first, or your knees?

     
    Id say hips mate
     
    Bollard
    Also, are you squatting barefoot and really driving your heels down as you push out?
     
    I find that trainers increase the tendency to roll onto the toes in the latter (higher) part of the squat. Barefoot remedies this.

     
    I squat in flat soled trainers mate similar to pumps but a bit more sturdy, like old school tennis shoes even.
     
    Thanks for the replies everyone. I may try the plate trick but im concerned if its gonna be safe when the numbers get heavier. I also plan on stretching my hams to try and improve their flexibilty and basically work on my form. As I said earlier its not a major pain i experience just a niggle but I need to sort it now, i dont want to get an injury set back.
     
    Cheers.
    #14
    rob26
    New Member
    • Total Posts : 14
    • Reward points: 2880
    • Joined: 2009/04/25 15:34:04
    • Status: offline
    Re:Squat problem 2011/03/18 16:28:36 (permalink)
    Also if its any help, when im at the full bottom of the squat, the bars in line with my knees if you were looking from a side on view as in not behind them or infront? If that makes sense haha
    #15
    SecondRow
    Olympian Member
    • Total Posts : 874
    • Reward points: 4069
    • Joined: 2005/12/27 21:44:58
    • Status: offline
    Re:Squat problem 2011/03/18 16:50:09 (permalink)
    Putting a plate under your heels is an artificial way to correct the problem - it will work fine, but you're not doing anything to fix the underlying cause.

    Current training: 6-day split
    Current cycle: Test E @ 500mg per week

    Current stats:
    Height : 192cm
    Weight : 272lbs
    Body Fat : 15.4%
    #16
    iaink
    Moderator
    • Total Posts : 23567
    • Reward points: 10602
    • Joined: 2006/01/03 17:59:15
    • Status: offline
    Re:Squat problem 2011/03/18 18:04:33 (permalink)
    Agree with above. I'd squat to a depth were I can maintain tech then working on building up the depth. However you do that.
     
    Also practically it's a pain in the proverbial. to walk back onto some plates or wood
    #17
    CitizenKane
    Pro-Member
    • Total Posts : 14946
    • Reward points: 7348
    • Joined: 2009/04/05 00:26:03
    • Status: offline
    Re:Squat problem 2011/03/18 18:54:32 (permalink)
    I could be completely wrong here in suggesting this, but the first thing I would be looking at is your technique, not necessarily anything to do with inflexibility or imbalances or whatever else.
     
    When I started out squatting I did exactly the same thing. The key is to just get into the mindset of sitting 'back' into the squat, not just sitting 'down'. Focus on initiating the lift by pushing your hips back, and concentrate on pushing up your ass/lower back when you are standing back up while all the time keeping the weight on your heels, not the balls of your feet.
     
    Adjusting your bar position will help this. You say you are placing the bar as high as you can get it. This is for all intents and purposes probably too high. Using a lower bar position will force you to lean forward throughout the lift more, initiate your hips more and activate your glutes and hamstring and lower back more like I mentioned above, which will all allow you to keep the weight on your heels much more easily.
     
    Squatting to a box may help also, in that it will teach you to sit back into the squat, not just down. Remember sit back, sit back, sit back...

    "Be adequate"
     
    #18
    iaink
    Moderator
    • Total Posts : 23567
    • Reward points: 10602
    • Joined: 2006/01/03 17:59:15
    • Status: offline
    Re:Squat problem 2011/03/18 19:06:12 (permalink)
    Technique is indeed the first port of call to suss out. Just opening up the hips and sitting into a squat more will help most no end.
    #19
    Rachfit
    Pro-Member
    • Total Posts : 3377
    • Reward points: 4229
    • Joined: 2009/10/21 16:14:24
    • Location: Nottingham
    • Status: offline
    Re:Squat problem 2011/03/21 09:46:33 (permalink)
    rob26

    Rachfit 
    If you think you have tight hams have you been trying to stretch them? if so how long for and have you noticed any change? 


    Not yet, but having read alot on forums, articles etc a common issue is tight hams. As I mentioned before this could be it as I can't touch my toes from standing...not even close actually. 

    I think ill start stretching them frequently to see if this helps
     
     
     
     
    It may be that they are not tight mate, you could have sciatic nerve tension. If that is the case then you can stretch them all you like it could just make it worse. Would need to mobilise your nerve instead.
    Agree with secondrow that you need to get to the cause

    "If you cant explain it simply, you dont understand it well enough" Albert Einstein
    Rach
    DipITS MBCA
    Specialist Biomechanics Coach 
     
    #20
    Page: 12 > Showing page 1 of 2
    Jump to:
    ©2017 All content is copyright of MuscleTalk.co.uk and its use elsewhere is prohibited.
    (posting guidelines | privacy | advertise | earnings disclaimer | contact us | supported by)
    © 2017 APG vNext Commercial Version 5.5