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Starting Muay Thai

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Suspirio
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2009/07/30 22:25:36 (permalink)
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Starting Muay Thai

I've done lots of boxing and a fair amount of wrestling, but I've never done any Muay Thai or anything like it.

I think I might give it a whirl. How does it compare in terms of training intensity and are there any things that I should know or expect beforehand?

Thanks
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    Re:Starting Muay Thai 2009/07/30 22:28:10 (permalink)
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    Checking Leg Kicks hurts like ****

    Training intensity wasn't that great where I train, not that I'm complaining though
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    Suspirio
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    Re:Starting Muay Thai 2009/07/30 22:34:53 (permalink)
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    What's checking leg kicks, blocking them?
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    Re:Starting Muay Thai 2009/07/30 22:51:47 (permalink)
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    when someone throws a kick at your leg you riase your own leg to block it

    Shin on Shin....It hurts
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    Sheeps_Clothing
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    Re:Starting Muay Thai 2009/07/30 22:54:25 (permalink)
    +2 (1)
    I've done a bit of muay thai mate. Muay thai/thai boxing is very popular with the fitness crowd who use it as a form of boxercise.

    I went to one club for a few sessions which was very highly respected and had a few top fighters, but the classes, which were open classes, not beginners, were more like boxercise, i.e. not hard enough, and more suitable for fitness training. 

    I left after a short time because I felt it was being run as a business aimed at the fitness crowd, their pricing and promotional offers reflected this, and I suspected they were not training people to be fighters.

    I want to give it a bit of a better shot when i've got the resources, there's 2 good clubs in London from inspection, although one seems to be far more of a fight camp (guess this is what you're after?).

    My advice is, it's great, but be careful where you try, it's far more of a fitness thing for a lot of people who would never do MMA or wrestling.
    #5
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    Re:Starting Muay Thai 2009/07/30 23:00:47 (permalink)
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    badboy007

    I've done a bit of muay thai mate. Muay thai/thai boxing is very popular with the fitness crowd who use it as a form of boxercise.

    I went to one club for a few sessions which was very highly respected and had a few top fighters, but the classes, which were open classes, not beginners, were more like boxercise, i.e. not hard enough, and more suitable for fitness training. 

    I left after a short time because I felt it was being run as a business aimed at the fitness crowd, their pricing and promotional offers reflected this, and I suspected they were not training people to be fighters.

    I want to give it a bit of a better shot when i've got the resources, there's 2 good clubs in London from inspection, although one seems to be far more of a fight camp (guess this is what you're after?).

    My advice is, it's great, but be careful where you try, it's far more of a fitness thing for a lot of people who would never do MMA or wrestling.


    Didn't really know that.

    My trained is also Paul Daleys Muay Thai coach so he is deadly serious about it
    #6
    Sheeps_Clothing
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    Re:Starting Muay Thai 2009/07/30 23:04:53 (permalink)
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    If you have Paul Daley's coach then i'm sure he trains you hard!

    My point is, some muay thai clubs are aimed at making profit over producing fighters, and there's a HUGE fitness market for muay thai, women in particular love it...

    Some muay thai clubs have 'gradings' for instance.
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    Suspirio
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    Re:Starting Muay Thai 2009/07/30 23:05:31 (permalink)
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    Cheers guys,

    Badboy007 that sounds terrible. I loathe gyms like that.

    I'm in London and the closest reputable place to me that doesn't cost an arm and a leg is Carlsons. Unlimited Muay Thai training for £40 a month.

    Very reasonable for London in my opinion, although the class times are a bit tight as BJJ takes the premium afternoon and evening slots at Carlsons.

    I'm going to wait until the new London Shoot opens just to see what they've got. It won't be cheap but I'm intrigued.
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    Re:Starting Muay Thai 2009/07/30 23:12:17 (permalink)
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    badboy007

    If you have Paul Daley's coach then i'm sure he trains you hard!

    My point is, some muay thai clubs are aimed at making profit over producing fighters, and there's a HUGE fitness market for muay thai, women in particular love it...

    Some muay thai clubs have 'gradings' for instance.


    Hard enough in my expert opinion

    Yeah I guess, My club is my Universities, so not for prophet just for breaking even...only £2 each session

    Yeah I heard about Muay Thai gradings, My trainer doesn't like them, allthough he says that after 1 year of training you would be at 'black belt' level....the rest is just perfecting what you have alreadfy learned

    Can't wait to get back to training, if only my knee would heal faster
    #9
    Sheeps_Clothing
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    Re:Starting Muay Thai 2009/07/30 23:35:56 (permalink)
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    Yes mate, this place was supposed to be one of the best too, maybe they just trained their fighters totally separately, who knows.

    Carlson's is very good value IMO, let me know what a class is like.

    The place I was thinking of going (when I drag myself out of the mess i'm in) was Minotaur in North London, around 30 mins I think from Liverpool Street, i.e. an absolute trek from where I guess you're based lol.

    The new LS gym is open, the timetable is the same, they say new classes are coming soon.

    From my understanding, LS now trains out of a gym called "Hooks Gym". I don't know whether the gym itself is an extention of London Shoot, or whether the gym brought LS in as a partner.
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    Re:Starting Muay Thai 2009/07/30 23:41:20 (permalink)
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    I'll  wait and see if LS update their website soon. I'll give it a week and then I may take a wander up there.

    Carlsons still seem like the best bet, and if I pay £60 a month I get all the Muay Thai and BJJ I can handle.


    #11
    T_Dawg Jack
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    Re:Starting Muay Thai 2009/07/31 00:22:10 (permalink)
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    Hey mate,

    As has already been mentioned make sure your training at a reputable gym. There's a huge potnetial to get fleeced, so before you lay down any money ask to check out/observe/take part in a class first, this obviously wont be an issue with the more reputbale clubs with some big names running it/instructing; the fitness clubs inevitably will, so that can be your marker test.

    Take your time with the kicks. Be sure your rolling your hips over, getting up on your toes, keeping your oppsite hand up. A good coach/instructor should be working with you to get your form sorted from day one. Square your technique away before you start banging out a gazillion reps on the bag.




     

    “I tried to put things in perspective but sometimes you're just too damn close to it.”
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    #12
    monitor
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    Re:Starting Muay Thai 2009/07/31 08:54:57 (permalink)
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    Call me naive, but I didn't know there were a few 'McDojos' out there when it came to MT.

    Guess I'm lucky where I go.

    From my experience, training for MT is sheer physical hell.  I'm dead on my feet when I have finished and have to rest for  few minutes before attempting the drive home.

    Good luck in your search.

    I'm a Pharma Company's bitch
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    Re:Starting Muay Thai 2009/07/31 09:43:03 (permalink)
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    Cheers guys,

    What are the warm ups like in Muay Thai?

    Normal stuff like push ups, star jumps etc or is it more unconventional.

    When I went from doing boxing to Wrestling/BJJ I found the different warm up techniques a little hard to deal with. The forward/backward rolls and the shrimping along the matts took some getting used to.
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    Re:Starting Muay Thai 2009/07/31 10:42:16 (permalink)
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    Suspirio


    What are the warm ups like in Muay Thai?

    Normal stuff like push ups, star jumps etc or is it more unconventional.




    No doubt it's going to differ from club to club.  My club, it's a pretty standard MA warmup, but it is fairly brutal.

    Then of course, you have the warm down to look forward to.

    I'm a Pharma Company's bitch
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    mystictal
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    Re:Starting Muay Thai 2009/07/31 14:30:45 (permalink)
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    What's so bad about gradings? It would/could help you to keep focused on improving rather than just going through the motions.

    I think it's quite a good idea! (in a respectable MT gym of course).
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    Re:Starting Muay Thai 2009/07/31 18:45:30 (permalink)
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    Gradings aren't the problem for me, it's who is giving them out and what their criteria is for doing so.
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    Re:Starting Muay Thai 2009/07/31 19:20:22 (permalink)
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    AWG

    badboy007

    I've done a bit of muay thai mate. Muay thai/thai boxing is very popular with the fitness crowd who use it as a form of boxercise.

    I went to one club for a few sessions which was very highly respected and had a few top fighters, but the classes, which were open classes, not beginners, were more like boxercise, i.e. not hard enough, and more suitable for fitness training. 

    I left after a short time because I felt it was being run as a business aimed at the fitness crowd, their pricing and promotional offers reflected this, and I suspected they were not training people to be fighters.

    I want to give it a bit of a better shot when i've got the resources, there's 2 good clubs in London from inspection, although one seems to be far more of a fight camp (guess this is what you're after?).

    My advice is, it's great, but be careful where you try, it's far more of a fitness thing for a lot of people who would never do MMA or wrestling.


    Didn't really know that.

    My trained is also Paul Daleys Muay Thai coach so he is deadly serious about it


    good old rupert! hasnt he stopped the training at the uni? so i heard? yes? no?
     
     
     
    anyway yer thai can be hard depending on who trains you, training one and one pad work with reapeatitive high kicks (ten in row etc) can seriously take it out of you! 
     
     some clubs just seem to do nothing and have really really long warm ups! (i know mine was 45 minute warm, didnt get to learn that much in a 90 session) when i thailand warm up was as long or as short as you want it to be.



    Psalm 144:1 - Blessed be the Lord my strength, which teacheth my hands to war, and my fingers to fight.

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    T_Dawg Jack
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    Re:Starting Muay Thai 2009/07/31 19:38:06 (permalink)
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    powerpusher

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    badboy007

    I've done a bit of muay thai mate. Muay thai/thai boxing is very popular with the fitness crowd who use it as a form of boxercise.

    I went to one club for a few sessions which was very highly respected and had a few top fighters, but the classes, which were open classes, not beginners, were more like boxercise, i.e. not hard enough, and more suitable for fitness training. 

    I left after a short time because I felt it was being run as a business aimed at the fitness crowd, their pricing and promotional offers reflected this, and I suspected they were not training people to be fighters.

    I want to give it a bit of a better shot when i've got the resources, there's 2 good clubs in London from inspection, although one seems to be far more of a fight camp (guess this is what you're after?).

    My advice is, it's great, but be careful where you try, it's far more of a fitness thing for a lot of people who would never do MMA or wrestling.


    Didn't really know that.

    My trained is also Paul Daleys Muay Thai coach so he is deadly serious about it


    good old rupert! hasnt he stopped the training at the uni? so i heard? yes? no?
     
     
     
    anyway yer thai can be hard depending on who trains you, training one and one pad work with reapeatitive high kicks (ten in row etc) can seriously take it out of you! 
     
     some clubs just seem to do nothing and have really really long warm ups! (i know mine was 45 minute warm, didnt get to learn that much in a 90 session) when i thailand warm up was as long or as short as you want it to be.

     
    That's my pet fücking hate that it is. An excessive and superfluous warm-up.
     
     

    “I tried to put things in perspective but sometimes you're just too damn close to it.”
    ― Cormac McCarthy, No Country for Old Men
    #19
    Suspirio
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    Re:Starting Muay Thai 2009/07/31 20:12:07 (permalink)
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    Half hour max for a warm up in my opinion. Anymore and it becomes a pointless.
    #20
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