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heart rate???

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englishgent
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2003/11/03 17:47:16 (permalink)

heart rate???

i was told that my maximum heart rate is 220 - my age
cardio = 80% of MHR
fat loss = 50 to 60% of MHR
The thing i dont understand is that some older people must be fitter than much younger people so this cant possibly apply to them????
i realise this is only a guide line but surly there is a better way ???
i am 27 so that would make my MHR 193 BPM and my fat loss rate between 96 and 115 BPM

this dosnt seem right, when i exercise at this level it dosnt feel like i am doing anything is there another way of working out what rate i should be aiming for??????

i can exercise at around 160 BPM for about an hour which is really hiting my self hard. But if my heart dosnt get above 120 i dont feel like i am doing anything .
Any help would be appriated [8)]
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    jdhar
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    RE: heart rate??? 2003/11/03 19:46:48 (permalink)
    At my age (19), doing 65% MHR doesn't feel like any work either - but that's why doing long-duration fat loss cardio has to be long in duration. By the end, if I'm lucky, I might break a sweat... but hardly anything compared to HIIT training. It still works though, even though it doesn't feel like it. If you do 160 bpm, which is nearing your max, you will end up eating your muscle for energy if you exercise for long durations. This is why there is a 'fat loss zone' and a 'cardiovascular zone'. One is targeted for fat loss, the other is for fitness.
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    Funtime
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    RE: heart rate??? 2003/11/04 09:32:53 (permalink)
    Your maximal heart rate is the highest number of times your heart can beat in a minute of exercising at volitional exhaustion. Maximum heart rate is a genetically determined "random" variable so your heart rate is individual to you. You should therefore take this value with a pinch of salt; The accepted error in the age-predicted formula is ± 10-12 bpm, so your heart rate could be as high as 205bpm.
    But this is only an estimate and the only real way of getting an persons maximal heart rate is through clinical testing. If your comfortable working at that heart rate then you'll be fine (unless you have a heart condition), use a scale from 1-10, 1 being very very light work and 10 being very very heavy. Then see where you rate with your associated heart rate (10 should be maximal). Do this with a exercise professional and not on your own as you'll be working maximally.
    The reason the industry call them "fat burning" zone and "cardiovascular" zone is for simplicity, and IMO this is wrong. This gives the image that in the fat burning zone that's all burnt. When in fact it's predominantly carbohydrate, even after an hour it's only at around a 60:40 split (carbs:fat). The intensity of exercise (i.e. % of MHR) only determines the percentage of carbs:fat that is burnt, but the real determinant should be calories burnt if your going for weight loss.
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    jdhar
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    RE: heart rate??? 2003/11/04 16:11:36 (permalink)
    Funtime... since you claim that after an hour, 60/40 (carbs/protein) is the ratio of nutrients burnt - 1) Where does fat fit in.. and 2) What if you are glycogen depleted.
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    Funtime
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    RE: heart rate??? 2003/11/05 21:19:17 (permalink)
    Jd,
    Typo, sorry meant to put fat, it was a simple mistake! But why would you really want to be glycogen depleted when doing exercise?
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    rego_psp22
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    RE: heart rate??? 2003/11/06 13:38:27 (permalink)
    quote:
    Originally posted by Funtime

    Your maximal heart rate is the highest number of times your heart can beat in a minute of exercising at volitional exhaustion. Maximum heart rate is a genetically determined "random" variable so your heart rate is individual to you. You should therefore take this value with a pinch of salt; The accepted error in the age-predicted formula is ± 10-12 bpm, so your heart rate could be as high as 205bpm.
    But this is only an estimate and the only real way of getting an persons maximal heart rate is through clinical testing. If your comfortable working at that heart rate then you'll be fine (unless you have a heart condition), use a scale from 1-10, 1 being very very light work and 10 being very very heavy. Then see where you rate with your associated heart rate (10 should be maximal). Do this with a exercise professional and not on your own as you'll be working maximally.
    The reason the industry call them "fat burning" zone and "cardiovascular" zone is for simplicity, and IMO this is wrong. This gives the image that in the fat burning zone that's all burnt. When in fact it's predominantly carbohydrate, even after an hour it's only at around a 60:40 split (carbs:fat). The intensity of exercise (i.e. % of MHR) only determines the percentage of carbs:fat that is burnt, but the real determinant should be calories burnt if your going for weight loss.



    As funtime said, the best way to get your MHR is to test it yourself. The formula method is only going to give you a ball park figure, and so you'd be better advised to do a maximum heart rate test your self. Have a friend stand by and get them to take your heart rate while you progressively increse the workload on a chosen machine (a stationary bike would be good).. When you're feeling like you're moving torard maximal exertion, and you feel you're very close to your limit, increase your intensity for a final 10 - 20 second push. You'll find this should do the trick :) You tend to get a higher MHR from a running movement as your arms a such are maving about. I managed to get 203 bpm hill climbing on a bike once :)

    http://www22.brinkster.com/regopsp22/images/comp.jpgthis is a graph of a computrainer exertion test i did once.. You can see the proportionality between HR and Workload quite nicely.

    Chris

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