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routine in prep for 2004/2005 rugby season

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Sheeps_Clothing
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2004/02/16 17:36:11 (permalink)
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routine in prep for 2004/2005 rugby season

after thinking about what i want to do, and how i train..i want to play rugby next season for the uni side - maybe in the seconds.

i want to play as back row as i prefer the physicality of it and think i dont have the ball skills for centre ( old position).

age;19 ( 1st yr uni student)
weight; 90kg's roughly
deadlift- 180kg
squat- 140kg
front squat- 100kgx3
push press- 90kg
strict press- 70kg

i think i have to focus on basic strength, particularly squatting and hamstring strength. my squat is a real slow mover.

mon-
squat; 5x3
good morning;5x3
turkish getup;3x8-10
20 mins cycling HIIT style

weds-
strict military press;5x3
close grip bench; 5x5
deadlift holds;3xtime
plate pinches;3xtime
20 mins cycling HIIT style

friday
deadlift;5x3 (percentage cycle)
chins; up to 20
weighted situps;3x8-10
20 mins HIIT

one other day a week will swim/ play footy/basketball

any opinions on the routine? i really think i have to get my squat into the 160kg-170kg, deadlift in thr 200kg+ category and military into the 90kg+ region in order to have the basic strength necessary to do well at uni level rugby especially playing as a flanker.

when these are reached i will really emphasise power snatches, powercleans, overhead squat, push presses, pylos, sprinting and odd object.

opinions? i also need to drop fat.
#1

15 Replies Related Threads

    acooper
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    RE: routine in prep for 2004/2005 rugby season 2004/02/16 18:05:20 (permalink)
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    If you are training for sport you need to incorporate more ballistic, reactive, and power moves into your routine. if you have been lifting regulalry to get to your current strength levels that should be and adequate base to progress onto specific training.

    To increase functional strength you need to be training frequently. The best splits would be

    3 full body per week mon, wed, fri
    2 lower 2 upper,
    mon lower
    tues upper
    thurs lower
    sat upper

    Building big numbers in squats, deads press etc... really will not do much to improve sports performance. Sports performance requires neural development to produce power, these lifts will not do this effectivly (on there own).

    Let me know what split you think would suit you best and i'll run through some programme ideas. I'll also address the body fat issue.

    Alan.
    #2
    Sheeps_Clothing
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    RE: routine in prep for 2004/2005 rugby season 2004/02/16 18:12:22 (permalink)
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    2x lower and 2x upper would be ok mate.

    i agree with what your saying, but i do think having a significantly stronger3 back, and stronger legs and shoulder girdle will help in a scrum situation. i also like tagging heavy weights

    if you could help out and incorporate heavy squats,deads and shoulder pressing i woulod be most grateful.
    #3
    acooper
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    RE: routine in prep for 2004/2005 rugby season 2004/02/16 19:40:14 (permalink)
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    quote:
    i agree with what your saying, but i do think having a significantly stronger3 back, and stronger legs and shoulder girdle will help in a scrum situation. i also like tagging heavy weights



    Agreed. You need to incorporate limit strength, strength speed, speed strength, reactive strength. The best way to do this is to use a form of complex training, the best choice would probably be Canadian complex as it allows you to concentrate on each element.

    It consists of 2 workouts for each body split (upper & lower) one ascending complex and one descending. Each session consists of a shock exercise (reactive strength), a ballistic exercise (speed strength) a power exercise (strength speed) and a limit strength exercise, reverse for descending complex.

    I would suggest the following split

    Day1 - lower ascending
    Day2 – upper ascedning
    Day3 – rest
    Day4 – lower descending
    Day5 – rest
    Day6 – upper descending
    Day7 – rest

    Here is a sample programme using this split (obviously exercises can be changed for others of similar effect)

    Day 1 Lower Ascending

    Shock – *Depth jumps (bodyweight)
    Ballistic – jump lunges (15-25% squat 1RM)
    Power – Power Snatch (100%)
    Limit Strength – Box Squat (100%)
    Supplementary – Good mornings (posterior chain) ab work.

    Day 2 Upper ascending

    Shock – *Depth push-ups (bodyweight)
    Ballistic –** ballistic bench press (15-15% bench press 1RM)
    Power – push press (100%)
    Limits strength – Incline Bench press (100%)
    Supplementary – Chin-ups

    Day 4 Lower descending

    Limit strength – full squat (100%)
    Power – Power clean
    Supplementary - RDLs (posterior chain)
    Ballistic – jump squats (15-25% squat 1RM)
    Shock – *Depth jumps (bodyweight)
    Supplementary – ab work

    Day 6 Upper descending

    Limit strength Bench press (100%)
    Power – Push press (100%)
    Ballistic - ** ballistic bench press (15-15% bench press 1RM)
    Shock – *Depth push-ups (bodyweight)
    Supplementary – Lat pulldowns

    *Depth jumps/push-ups: starting on a 6-18” box/bench drop down and immediately explode into the air as high as possible. Reset between each rep

    ** ballistic benchpress: on a smith machine throw the bar into the air as high as possible for each rep. Reset between each rep

    This programme allows parallel development of all the required attributes for sports training and also has the benefit of complex training. I.e. the shock exercise will stimulate the nervous system for the following limit strength exercise and vice versa. It is however very taxing on the central nervous system (CNS) so training must be structured to avoid overtraining whilst still allowing sufficient stimulation for supercompensation.

    Here is a 4 week block I would suggest

    Week 1

    Limit strength 5x5 85% 5RM
    Power 5x5 85% 5RM
    Ballistic 2x7 15%
    Shock 2x5
    Supplementary 3x6

    Week 2

    Limit strength 4x4 90% 4RM
    Power 4x4 90% 4RM
    Ballistic 2x6 20%
    Shock 2x6
    Supplementary 3x6

    Week 3

    Limit strength 3x2 95% 2RM
    Power 3x2 95% 2RM
    Ballistic 2x5 25%
    Shock 2x7
    Supplementary 3x6

    Week 4 unloading and test week

    Limit strength – test 1rm
    Power – test 1rm
    Ballistic - none
    Shock - none
    Supplementary - none


    ALAN.
    #4
    GoldenArrow
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    RE: routine in prep for 2004/2005 rugby season 2004/02/16 20:04:48 (permalink)
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    You need your snatches and cleans and the like in there, preferably with some plyos....I guess you've never seen/heard of this machine, but last I heard the England team were using it...they call it the Jam on this site...


    http://www.exrx.net/WeightExercises/Power/LVJam.html
    #5
    suggy3001
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    RE: routine in prep for 2004/2005 rugby season 2004/02/16 20:33:07 (permalink)
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    just be careful not to get caught up in your gym lifts. I havent lifted heavy for 6 months now but i feel and probably am more powerful and lighter on my feet than ever, and consequently am breaking tackles/gain line more as a 13 stone rugby player than i ever did as a slower 14.5 stone powerhouse. If you are training for rugby, always prioritise your performance on the pitch rather than the numbers in the gym.
    #6
    PauliE
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    RE: routine in prep for 2004/2005 rugby season 2004/02/16 22:59:14 (permalink)
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    I'm no expert on this but if you're training 3 or more times a week aren't you going to be too tired for rugby?
    #7
    dolex
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    RE: routine in prep for 2004/2005 rugby season 2004/02/17 01:13:05 (permalink)
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    good advice acoop
    #8
    Voivod
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    RE: routine in prep for 2004/2005 rugby season 2004/02/17 01:44:37 (permalink)
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    quote:
    If you are training for rugby, always prioritise your performance on the pitch rather than the numbers in the gym.


    100% agree with that. If you want to be good at rugby then - PLAY RUGBY!! Save your energy for the training field mate, not the gym.

    Good luck.
    #9
    shreklikedave
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    RE: routine in prep for 2004/2005 rugby season 2004/02/17 08:50:01 (permalink)
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    2 sessions per week concentrating on whole body lifts would be fine mate.

    More strength based training off season, moving into power and more match specific training as the season approaches and during the season
    #10
    Sheeps_Clothing
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    RE: routine in prep for 2004/2005 rugby season 2004/02/17 12:10:30 (permalink)
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    just to re-iterate, this will be the off season for me as im not playing this season
    #11
    suggy3001
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    RE: routine in prep for 2004/2005 rugby season 2004/02/17 12:34:20 (permalink)
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    well i would say you have 3 months to use a pure strength routine. that gives you 3 months for fitness and power, phasing into more specific work for the last 6 weeks before the season kicks off.
    #12
    acooper
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    RE: routine in prep for 2004/2005 rugby season 2004/02/17 12:43:24 (permalink)
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    quote:
    Originally posted by suggy3001

    well i would say you have 3 months to use a pure strength routine. that gives you 3 months for fitness and power, phasing into more specific work for the last 6 weeks before the season kicks off.



    Why periodize the training when you can develop the elements in parallel?

    #13
    PikeKing
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    RE: routine in prep for 2004/2005 rugby season 2004/02/17 12:47:13 (permalink)
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    yeah I agree with that, periodizing training to work on different areas is an outdated and crap approach. You're much better working on everything.
    #14
    suggy3001
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    RE: routine in prep for 2004/2005 rugby season 2004/02/17 13:11:18 (permalink)
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    why?
    #15
    acooper
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    RE: routine in prep for 2004/2005 rugby season 2004/02/17 13:38:42 (permalink)
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    1) The different elements supplement each other.
    2) Thinking long term you never get to far away from any element so you make constant progression instead of starting from scratch each season.
    3) All sports need a varying amount of each element so it makes sense to train them in parallel.
    #16
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